Gorgeous dinner of porchetta stuffed with wild mushrooms, celeriac mash & gravy

wild mushroom stuffed porchetta

Serves 10

  • For the stuffed porchetta

  • 1 large handful mixed wild mushrooms (such as shiitake, field mushrooms and oyster)

  • olive oil

  • 1 small bunch fresh thyme, leaves picked

  • 2 bulbs garlic, cloves of 1 bulb peeled and finely sliced

  • 1 knob butter

  • zest of 2 lemons

  • sea salt

  • freshly ground black pepper

  • a few slices stale bread, roughly torn

  • 3 kg higher-welfare pork loin, boned, skin off, belly on

  • 2 tablespoons fennel seeds

  • 2 sticks celery, washed and roughly chopped

  • 2 carrots, washed and roughly chopped

  • 1 onion, peeled and roughly chopped

  • 1 small wineglass cider

  • 1 tablespoon flour

  • 565 ml organic chicken or vegetable stock

  • For the mash

  • 1 kg celeriac

  • 500 g potatoes

  • 1 knob butter

  • 150 ml milk

Preheat your oven to its highest setting. Tear or roughly chop your mushrooms – thick, thin and wonky, it doesn't matter, you want it chunky and rustic. Heat a large frying pan over a medium heat, add a lug of olive oil, the thyme leaves and mushrooms, and toss around a bit. Next, add the sliced garlic and knob of butter. Fry everything off for about 10 minutes until the mushrooms are browning a little around the edges. Add the lemon zest with a good pinch of salt and pepper, then remove to a bowl and let it cool. Once cool, add the bread and toss together.



Now turn your attention to the pork. Lay the loin and belly on a board, fatty-side down, and use a knife to make a little pocket between the loin and the belly meat. Stuff the cooled mushroom mixture into the pocket, then season well all over with salt and pepper. If you've got any garlicky, thyme and lemon juices left in the pan, pour these over the pork for some wonderful added flavour. Rub all the seasoning and juices into the pork.



Roll the belly around the loin and tie it tightly with 5 or 6 pieces of string to keep it all in place. If your butcher gave you the bones, scatter them around the bottom of an appropriately sized roasting tray – you want the pork to sit quite snugly in the tray - and put the meat on top. Place in the oven and immediately turn it down to 180°C/350°F/gas 4 so the meat cooks through nice and evenly. This is a good time to get the crackling ready for the oven, so score the skin with a small sharp knife to open it up for seasoning. Bash up the fennel seeds and salt in a pestle and mortar, rub a generous amount of this into the skin and place it on a baking tray.



After the meat has had an hour in the oven, take it out and add the chopped vegetables and remaining bulb of garlic to the tray, roughly broken apart into unpeeled cloves. Pour in the glass of cider and give the tray a shake to coat everything. Put it all back in the oven to cook for another hour. The crackling can also go in at this point.



Before the second hour is up, put a large pan of salted water on to boil. Peel and cut the celeriac and potatoes into even-sized chunks, then boil for 12 to 15 minutes until soft and ready to mash. Drain and let them steam-dry, then return to the pan with a good knob of butter, some seasoning and the milk. Mash until smooth, adding a splash more milk if you need it. Cover and keep warm until ready to serve.



When the pork is ready, remove it from the oven on to a plate and cover with tin foil, so it can rest for about 20 minutes while you crack on with the gravy. You'll have some nice roasted root veg and sticky goodness left in the bottom of the tray. Pour or spoon off the excess fat in the tray, then place it over a very low heat and pour in the stock a little at a time (you may not need to use all of it), using a potato masher as you go to mash up all the vegetables. Keep stirring to make sure you get all the lovely sticky brown bits off the bottom of the tray. Add the flour and keep reducing the gravy down until you get the consistency you like. Pass the gravy through a sieve to get rid of any lumps, then serve with the warm mash, stuffed pork and beautiful crackling.

Nutritional Information

Gorgeous dinner of porchetta stuffed with wild mushrooms, celeriac mash & gravy

With proper homemade gravy

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0 foodies cooked this
This roast pork recipe looks impressive, is a total winner and isn't actually hard to make at all
Serves 10
2h 30m
Not too tricky
Method

This is a bit of a special weekend dinner and, despite how impressive the stuffed pork looks, it's honestly not that hard to make. It's an exciting dish and the end result will definitely blow you away, but you'll have to take a bit of time with it and show it some love. You'll want to buy the pork from a good butcher and ask for a boneless loin of pork with the skin off (but keep it for crackling) and belly on. Keeping the belly on makes stuffing the pork much easier. A nice little tip is to ask your butcher to give you the bones, as these will make a brilliant trivet to roast your meat on.

Preheat your oven to its highest setting. Tear or roughly chop your mushrooms – thick, thin and wonky, it doesn't matter, you want it chunky and rustic. Heat a large frying pan over a medium heat, add a lug of olive oil, the thyme leaves and mushrooms, and toss around a bit. Next, add the sliced garlic and knob of butter. Fry everything off for about 10 minutes until the mushrooms are browning a little around the edges. Add the lemon zest with a good pinch of salt and pepper, then remove to a bowl and let it cool. Once cool, add the bread and toss together.

Now turn your attention to the pork. Lay the loin and belly on a board, fatty-side down, and use a knife to make a little pocket between the loin and the belly meat. Stuff the cooled mushroom mixture into the pocket, then season well all over with salt and pepper. If you've got any garlicky, thyme and lemon juices left in the pan, pour these over the pork for some wonderful added flavour. Rub all the seasoning and juices into the pork.

Roll the belly around the loin and tie it tightly with 5 or 6 pieces of string to keep it all in place. If your butcher gave you the bones, scatter them around the bottom of an appropriately sized roasting tray – you want the pork to sit quite snugly in the tray - and put the meat on top. Place in the oven and immediately turn it down to 180°C/350°F/gas 4 so the meat cooks through nice and evenly. This is a good time to get the crackling ready for the oven, so score the skin with a small sharp knife to open it up for seasoning. Bash up the fennel seeds and salt in a pestle and mortar, rub a generous amount of this into the skin and place it on a baking tray.

After the meat has had an hour in the oven, take it out and add the chopped vegetables and remaining bulb of garlic to the tray, roughly broken apart into unpeeled cloves. Pour in the glass of cider and give the tray a shake to coat everything. Put it all back in the oven to cook for another hour. The crackling can also go in at this point.

Before the second hour is up, put a large pan of salted water on to boil. Peel and cut the celeriac and potatoes into even-sized chunks, then boil for 12 to 15 minutes until soft and ready to mash. Drain and let them steam-dry, then return to the pan with a good knob of butter, some seasoning and the milk. Mash until smooth, adding a splash more milk if you need it. Cover and keep warm until ready to serve.

When the pork is ready, remove it from the oven on to a plate and cover with tin foil, so it can rest for about 20 minutes while you crack on with the gravy. You'll have some nice roasted root veg and sticky goodness left in the bottom of the tray. Pour or spoon off the excess fat in the tray, then place it over a very low heat and pour in the stock a little at a time (you may not need to use all of it), using a potato masher as you go to mash up all the vegetables. Keep stirring to make sure you get all the lovely sticky brown bits off the bottom of the tray. Add the flour and keep reducing the gravy down until you get the consistency you like. Pass the gravy through a sieve to get rid of any lumps, then serve with the warm mash, stuffed pork and beautiful crackling.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:

Calories

Calories are just a unit of energy. If you eat more than you use you can gain weight, or lose it if you don't eat enough. How much you need depends on your weight, gender and how active you are, but it's around 2,000 a day.

Carbs

Carbs are a great source of energy and, excluding foods such as potatoes, are made from grains - like bread, pasta and cereal. We all need carbs, but try to make them all wholegrain by sticking to brown bread, rice and pasta - they are much more nutritious.

Sugar

We all deserve a treat sometimes, but try to limit your sugar intake. Most of your sugar should come from raw fruit and milk, because they give us lots of nutrients too. Always check food labels so you know how much sugar you're eating.

Fat

We all need to eat a small amount of fat because it protects our organs and helps us grow. But we need to be careful about how much fat we eat and what kinds of fat, because in higher levels it's associated with weight gain, diabetes, cancer and heart disease.

Saturates

Saturated or "bad fats" are in beef, pork, chicken skin, butter, cream and cheese. Too much can be bad for our heart and cholesterol levels, but unsaturated or "good fats" in fish, nuts, avocados and some oils can help keep our hearts healthy if eaten in moderation.

Protein

Protein helps our muscles to grow and repair, as well as providing you with essential amino acids. When it comes to protein, try to eat leaner sources such as chicken and fish or non-meat sources such as eggs, dairy, beans, nuts, seeds, tofu and pulses.
  • Calories 676
    34%
  • Carbs 9.3g
    4%
  • Sugar 2.7g 3%
  • Fat 48.2g 69%
  • Saturates 17.1g 86%
  • Protein 49.3g 109%
Of an adult's reference intake

BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

Close

Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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  • For the stuffed porchetta

  • 1 large handful mixed wild mushrooms (such as shiitake, field mushrooms and oyster)

  • olive oil

  • 1 small bunch fresh thyme, leaves picked

  • 2 bulbs garlic, cloves of 1 bulb peeled and finely sliced

  • 1 knob butter

  • zest of 2 lemons

  • sea salt

  • freshly ground black pepper

  • a few slices stale bread, roughly torn

  • 3 kg higher-welfare pork loin, boned, skin off, belly on

  • 2 tablespoons fennel seeds

  • 2 sticks celery, washed and roughly chopped

  • 2 carrots, washed and roughly chopped

  • 1 onion, peeled and roughly chopped

  • 1 small wineglass cider

  • 1 tablespoon flour

  • 565 ml organic chicken or vegetable stock

  • For the mash

  • 1 kg celeriac

  • 500 g potatoes

  • 1 knob butter

  • 150 ml milk