Crackin' crab briks with couscous salad & salsa

crab parcels and couscous

Serves 4

  • For the briks

  • 1-2 preserved lemons

  • 2 spring onions

  • ½ a bunch of fresh coriander

  • 400 g pot-caught crabmeat (a mixture of brown & white meat), from sustainable sources

  • 2 teaspoons harissa, plus extra to serve

  • 4 large sheets of filo pastry (from a 270g pack)

  • olive oil

  • For the salad

  • ½ teaspoon caraway seeds

  • ½ a mug (150g) couscous

  • 2 teaspoons sun-dried tomato purée

  • ½ a bulb of fennel

  • ½ a bunch of fresh mint

  • 1 lemon

  • extra virgin olive oil

  • 1 pomegranate

  • For the salsa

  • 1 large ripe tomato

  • 1 thumb-sized piece of ginger

  • ½ a lemon

  • To serve

  • fat-free natural yoghurt

Ingredients out • Kettle boiled • Large frying pan, medium heat • Food processor (coarse grater)



START COOKING

Finely chop the preserved lemons, trimmed spring onions and coriander (stalks and all) • Mix in a bowl with the crabmeat and harissa • Lay out a sheet of filo pastry, add ¼ of the mixture and shape into the size of a packet of playing cards at the centre of the bottom of the sheet, then push your thumb into the centre of the filling to make a space for it to expand as it cooks • Fold in the sides, then fold them up • Repeat until you have 4 briks • Put 1 tablespoon of olive oil into the pan, then add the briks and cook until golden and crisp on both sides • Add the caraway seeds to the side of the pan and toast for a minute, then scrape into a salad bowl



Put ½ a mug of couscous, 1 mug of boiling water, the tomato purée and a pinch of salt into a bowl and cover • Pick and reserve the fennel tops, then roughly chop and grate the bulb in the processor • Tip into the salad bowl, then chop and add the top leafy half of the mint • Squeeze in the lemon juice and drizzle with 1 tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil • Season to taste and toss everything together



Finely grate the tomato and ginger into a little bowl • Add a pinch of salt and pepper, a good squeeze of lemon juice and 1 tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil and mix together • Fluff up the couscous, then tip on to a platter • Pile the salad in the middle, then bash the halved pomegranate over the top so the seeds tumble out • Scatter over the reserved fennel tops, pop the crab briks on a board and serve with dollops of yoghurt and the salsa

Nutritional Information

Crackin' crab briks with couscous salad & salsa

Filo pastry parcels filled with delicious spicy crab

More Quick fixes recipes >
0 foodies cooked this
These North African-style crab briks are great for a beautiful, speedy lunch
Serves 4
15m
Not too tricky
Method

Ingredients out • Kettle boiled • Large frying pan, medium heat • Food processor (coarse grater)

START COOKING
Finely chop the preserved lemons, trimmed spring onions and coriander (stalks and all) • Mix in a bowl with the crabmeat and harissa • Lay out a sheet of filo pastry, add ¼ of the mixture and shape into the size of a packet of playing cards at the centre of the bottom of the sheet, then push your thumb into the centre of the filling to make a space for it to expand as it cooks • Fold in the sides, then fold them up • Repeat until you have 4 briks • Put 1 tablespoon of olive oil into the pan, then add the briks and cook until golden and crisp on both sides • Add the caraway seeds to the side of the pan and toast for a minute, then scrape into a salad bowl

Put ½ a mug of couscous, 1 mug of boiling water, the tomato purée and a pinch of salt into a bowl and cover • Pick and reserve the fennel tops, then roughly chop and grate the bulb in the processor • Tip into the salad bowl, then chop and add the top leafy half of the mint • Squeeze in the lemon juice and drizzle with 1 tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil • Season to taste and toss everything together

Finely grate the tomato and ginger into a little bowl • Add a pinch of salt and pepper, a good squeeze of lemon juice and 1 tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil and mix together • Fluff up the couscous, then tip on to a platter • Pile the salad in the middle, then bash the halved pomegranate over the top so the seeds tumble out • Scatter over the reserved fennel tops, pop the crab briks on a board and serve with dollops of yoghurt and the salsa

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:

Calories

Calories are just a unit of energy. If you eat more than you use you can gain weight, or lose it if you don't eat enough. How much you need depends on your weight, gender and how active you are, but it's around 2,000 a day.

Carbs

Carbs are a great source of energy and, excluding foods such as potatoes, are made from grains - like bread, pasta and cereal. We all need carbs, but try to make them all wholegrain by sticking to brown bread, rice and pasta - they are much more nutritious.

Sugar

We all deserve a treat sometimes, but try to limit your sugar intake. Most of your sugar should come from raw fruit and milk, because they give us lots of nutrients too. Always check food labels so you know how much sugar you're eating.

Fat

We all need to eat a small amount of fat because it protects our organs and helps us grow. But we need to be careful about how much fat we eat and what kinds of fat, because in higher levels it's associated with weight gain, diabetes, cancer and heart disease.

Saturates

Saturated or "bad fats" are in beef, pork, chicken skin, butter, cream and cheese. Too much can be bad for our heart and cholesterol levels, but unsaturated or "good fats" in fish, nuts, avocados and some oils can help keep our hearts healthy if eaten in moderation.

Protein

Protein helps our muscles to grow and repair, as well as providing you with essential amino acids. When it comes to protein, try to eat leaner sources such as chicken and fish or non-meat sources such as eggs, dairy, beans, nuts, seeds, tofu and pulses.
  • Calories 457
    23%
  • Carbs 46.1g
    18%
  • Sugar 6.4g 7%
  • Fat 13.4g 19%
  • Saturates 1.7g 9%
  • Protein 33g 73%
Of an adult's reference intake

BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

Close

Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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