Southern pecan & apple salad

Serves 4

  • olive oil

  • 25 g butter

  • 50 g soft light brown sugar

  • 100 g pecans

  • 2 red or green apples

  • 2 chicory, leaves removed, washed and spun dry

  • a couple of handfuls of mixed leaves, such as rocket and radicchio, washed and spun dry

  • For the dressing:

  • zest and juice of 1 orange

  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

  • 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar

  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

  • sea salt

  • freshly ground black pepper

I've noticed that Southern women put plenty of time and care into their food, so it's nice to respect that by taking a bit of time to slice the apples for this salad delicately and make them look beautiful. This is such a light and colourful salad, but it's also a wonderful base, which you can manipulate into a more substantial meal by adding things like crispy bacon, shredded pork, blue cheese, slices of clementine, chervil, tarragon or basil. Any of these things stirred through will build on what is already an absolutely delicious salad.



Spend a bit of time washing and preparing your salad leaves and dry them either in a spinner or by swinging them around in a tea towel above your head like a lunatic. This will make a big difference to the way the dressing sticks to the salad leaves, so it's well worth doing.




Lightly rub a baking tray with some olive oil and put to one side. Put a large pan on a low heat and add your butter and sugar. Leave on a gentle simmer for a couple of minutes, stirring occasionally to stop it catching, until the sugar has completely dissolved and the mixture starts to darken. Gently stir in your pecans until they're well coated in the caramel syrup. Be careful not to splash yourself, and don't be tempted to have a taste because hot caramel can burn quite badly. Once coated, tip the nuts on to the oiled tray and use the back of a spoon to separate them out into one layer. Leave them to cool so the caramel can harden on the nuts.



Meanwhile, make your dressing. Put your orange zest and juice, Dijon mustard and white wine vinegar into a large salad bowl and add a good lug of extra virgin olive oil. Whisk them, then have a taste – you want to get a nice balance between the sharpness of the vinegar and the smoothness of the oil, so add a little more oil if needed, then season carefully with salt and pepper.



Core, quarter and finely slice your apples and add to the bowl with all your leaves. Break the cooled pecans apart, add half of them to the bowl, and use your hands to delicately toss and dress everything. Serve on one big platter, or divide up between plates, and finish by crumbling over the rest of your beautiful caramel pecans.

Nutritional Information

Southern pecan & apple salad

With radicchio, chicory and a zesty dressing

0 foodies cooked this
This is such a light, colourful and versatile salad and the beautiful crunchy textures make it a pleasure to eat.
Serves 4
15m
Super easy
Print this recipe
Method

I've noticed that Southern women put plenty of time and care into their food, so it's nice to respect that by taking a bit of time to slice the apples for this salad delicately and make them look beautiful. This is such a light and colourful salad, but it's also a wonderful base, which you can manipulate into a more substantial meal by adding things like crispy bacon, shredded pork, blue cheese, slices of clementine, chervil, tarragon or basil. Any of these things stirred through will build on what is already an absolutely delicious salad.

Spend a bit of time washing and preparing your salad leaves and dry them either in a spinner or by swinging them around in a tea towel above your head like a lunatic. This will make a big difference to the way the dressing sticks to the salad leaves, so it's well worth doing.


Lightly rub a baking tray with some olive oil and put to one side. Put a large pan on a low heat and add your butter and sugar. Leave on a gentle simmer for a couple of minutes, stirring occasionally to stop it catching, until the sugar has completely dissolved and the mixture starts to darken. Gently stir in your pecans until they're well coated in the caramel syrup. Be careful not to splash yourself, and don't be tempted to have a taste because hot caramel can burn quite badly. Once coated, tip the nuts on to the oiled tray and use the back of a spoon to separate them out into one layer. Leave them to cool so the caramel can harden on the nuts.

Meanwhile, make your dressing. Put your orange zest and juice, Dijon mustard and white wine vinegar into a large salad bowl and add a good lug of extra virgin olive oil. Whisk them, then have a taste – you want to get a nice balance between the sharpness of the vinegar and the smoothness of the oil, so add a little more oil if needed, then season carefully with salt and pepper.

Core, quarter and finely slice your apples and add to the bowl with all your leaves. Break the cooled pecans apart, add half of them to the bowl, and use your hands to delicately toss and dress everything. Serve on one big platter, or divide up between plates, and finish by crumbling over the rest of your beautiful caramel pecans.

Whether it's delicious vegetarian or vegan recipes you're after, or ideas for gluten or dairy-free dishes, you'll find plenty here to inspire you. For more info on how we classify our lifestyle recipes please read our special diets fact sheet, or or for more information on how to plan your meals please see our special diets guidance.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:

Calories

Calories are just a unit of energy. If you eat more than you use you can gain weight, or lose it if you don't eat enough. How much you need depends on your weight, gender and how active you are, but it's around 2,000 a day.

Carbs

Carbs are a great source of energy and, excluding foods such as potatoes, are made from grains - like bread, pasta and cereal. We all need carbs, but try to make them all wholegrain by sticking to brown bread, rice and pasta - they are much more nutritious.

Sugar

We all deserve a treat sometimes, but try to limit your sugar intake. Most of your sugar should come from raw fruit and milk, because they give us lots of nutrients too. Always check food labels so you know how much sugar you're eating.

Fat

We all need to eat a small amount of fat because it protects our organs and helps us grow. But we need to be careful about how much fat we eat and what kinds of fat, because in higher levels it's associated with weight gain, diabetes, cancer and heart disease.

Saturates

Saturated or "bad fats" are in beef, pork, chicken skin, butter, cream and cheese. Too much can be bad for our heart and cholesterol levels, but unsaturated or "good fats" in fish, nuts, avocados and some oils can help keep our hearts healthy if eaten in moderation.

Protein

Protein helps our muscles to grow and repair, as well as providing you with essential amino acids. When it comes to protein, try to eat leaner sources such as chicken and fish or non-meat sources such as eggs, dairy, beans, nuts, seeds, tofu and pulses.
  • Calories 428
    21%
  • Carbs 23.2g
    9%
  • Sugar 21.6g 24%
  • Fat 34g 49%
  • Saturates 6g 30%
  • Protein 3.7g 8%
Of an adult's reference intake

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BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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  • olive oil

  • 25 g butter

  • 50 g soft light brown sugar

  • 100 g pecans

  • 2 red or green apples

  • 2 chicory, leaves removed, washed and spun dry

  • a couple of handfuls of mixed leaves, such as rocket and radicchio, washed and spun dry

  • For the dressing:

  • zest and juice of 1 orange

  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

  • 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar

  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

  • sea salt

  • freshly ground black pepper