forum: Food & Drink

Subscribe to forums RSS

#11 Wed 12 Mar 08 4:02pm

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Tin plated copper pans. Keep them or not????

Just realised - you are living in Fruili!

Your area is where the Ferroli family came from, who founded Ferroli S.p.a! Ferroli industries started out making copperware! Its quite possible that your pan was made by Ferroli - the date would be about right I wonder if they still make copperware locally?

    Likes (0)

#12 Wed 12 Mar 08 4:48pm

madamada

Forum super champ
Occupation living life
From Friuli northern Italy
Member since Mon 14 Jan 08

Re: Tin plated copper pans. Keep them or not????

must search

    Likes (0)

#13 Fri 14 Mar 08 2:27pm

Sweet Tomaita

Member
Occupation Sales Assistant/Housewife
From Cambridgeshire, East England
Member since Thu 13 Mar 08

Re: Tin plated copper pans. Keep them or not????

GeoffP, you're an encyclopedia (hope I spelt that right?) of knowledge. This is the impression I get from reading your replies across the forum. Always a joy.

    Likes (0)

#14 Fri 14 Mar 08 2:28pm

The White Rabbit

Forum super champ
From Sydney, Australia
Member since Tue 22 Jun 04

Re: Tin plated copper pans. Keep them or not????

GeoffP wrote:

I've never heard of copper pans being plated with anything else but tin (the stainless steel lined ones are laminated rather than plated). I'm sure it should be possible - heavy silver plating or hot dip zinc galvanising spring to mind as maybe being suitable (but you're the expert White Rabbit, what do you think?) - but tinning is the way that has stood the test of time.

Copper pans probably not, as plating is not the easiest/cheapest/most robust/thickest coating method for that shape. Chemically speaking it is very possible (did it several times a week for almost three years in a job i had a while ago). It's used a lot in other industries (mine was radiopharmaceutical production) and nickel plating solutions are a hot topic for copper substrates (and other substrates). You are probably more likely to find someone to do tinning in europe. We have a small population here with very little call for such things, and even for retail electroplating. Silver probably isn't great as it reacts readily with sulfur. Placing zinc on a surface is generally done for steel as it creates "galvanic" (from the galvanic series) protection for the iron (aka steel) to reduce the rate of corrosion. Copper and zinc are not very friendly in the galvanic series, so it's less likely.

    Likes (0)

#15 Fri 14 Mar 08 5:46pm

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Tin plated copper pans. Keep them or not????

I think we're agreed, White Rabbit, copper pans should be re-plated with a molten tin wipe. I've actually found a couple of people in my area who will do it, and there are a number of companies in the UK who specialise in repairing and refurbishing copper pans. They'll do mail order as well.

    Likes (0)

#16 Sat 15 Mar 08 5:29pm

Maree

Forum super champ
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Sat 10 Mar 07

Re: Tin plated copper pans. Keep them or not????

Geoff, don't bother keeping your envy for the tin plated copper pans "under cover". I'd "kill" for them.

My favourite food-ware store (of 35yrs) is relocating and have had a large discount on goods, especially to long-standing customers. Reason I didn't buy?...space and up-keep of them. Only reason. But I have lots of Le Creuset, which I love and always does what I want it to do.


"Cook with love and laughter ..."
    Likes (0)

#17 Mon 17 Mar 08 7:47am

madamada

Forum super champ
Occupation living life
From Friuli northern Italy
Member since Mon 14 Jan 08

Re: Tin plated copper pans. Keep them or not????

I just happened to know that a relative in low of my daughter is able to plate copper pans, they did it usually at home like an ordinary repair work, and he is not an old man. Good skills are not yet got lost but severely threatened to disappear.  In short we will only be able to click a mouse and fish everything  out of the web

    Likes (0)

#18 Mon 17 Mar 08 10:43am

The White Rabbit

Forum super champ
From Sydney, Australia
Member since Tue 22 Jun 04

Re: Tin plated copper pans. Keep them or not????

I think some of those sort of skills are disappearing because other materials are now cheaper to produce and give good or better results. Perhaps another reason is that with greater awareness of the hazards (chemical and physical) of using molten metals (or electroplating), people are being more careful and sometimes the result is that some operators are unable to put into place the appropriate safety precautions (due to cost or cost effectiveness) to protect their workers and if the demand isn't there then it's not worth the effort.

    Likes (0)

#19 Mon 17 Mar 08 11:34am

madamada

Forum super champ
Occupation living life
From Friuli northern Italy
Member since Mon 14 Jan 08

Re: Tin plated copper pans. Keep them or not????

I must agree, but as a poet I find homo faber  perhaps less healthy but more interesting than a  vaccumpacked robot
nothing to do with skill and logic of course

    Likes (0)

#20 Wed 23 Jul 08 4:28pm

PeterOwensBabs

Member
Member since Wed 23 Jul 08

Re: Tin plated copper pans. Keep them or not????

Ok first Copper is not toxic, agreed, however it is vital that you keep your pans tin lined as the verdigris or copper mould that grows on your pans is.It grows very quickly and is highly toxic. That nice green patina the stuff with the funny velvet texture, thats the stuff that kills. It loves to grow on copper with a combination of moisture, organic oils, and salt. Familiar ingredients? Humm sounds like what's in most cooking that I do! Ok so tin plating is needed, I have a local copper smith / sculptor who does mine , hand wiped beautiful job a true craftsman. Problem is it lasts maybe 6 months at home use or 2 months in a commercial kitchen, and his work is not cheap at hundred bucks a pot. Ok Im a skilled guy who works mettle for a living,with a well equipped workshop, why cant I do it my self? After all people have been doing it with basic equipment for hundreds of years. So where do I find out just how? Thats what I don't know. Lots of bits of information but nothing solid. I know the melting point of copper and of Tin so I know what to heat it to. I know a good flux for tin ( Im told the europeans use oilve oil as flux) but I cant get it to work. ANY ONE OUT THERE REALY KNOW HOW YOU RE TIN COOKING POTS? Im not interested in electro plating or other industrial processes using furnaces or baths of toxic acid to pickle in, I mean a bloke in the 50's showed up on a push bike with a few tins of stuff and did it in an hour in your granny's kitchen - how hard can it be????HELP????!!!!!

    Likes (0)

Powered by PunBB.