jollof rice recipe

It’s amazing how food can tell a story – how traces of it can be found throughout a continent, showing the diaspora of people and the spread of cultures across thousands of miles.

Jollof rice is more of a concept than a recipe, because it’s found in various guises all over West Africa. Its other name is Benachin, which means “one pot” in the language of the Wolof people who invented it – evidently throwing lots of lovely food in a pan and letting the heat do its thing has always been a popular cheat.

The Wolof ruled an empire from what is now known as Senegal between 1360 to 1549. For a while they were a powerful and wealthy kingdom, even trading with Europe before it fell apart through infighting among the different states. By the time it disintegrated though, its travels, trades and conquests had spread its people and cultures right throughout the area. So it’s no surprise that Jollof rice springs up in the list of favourite dishes for Ghana, about 2,000km from their homeland in Senegal. In fact, it springs up all even further east, in countries such as Nigeria and Cameroon. Because of this distance, and all the differences in culture and climate, the ingredients vary wildly, but the principle is that you cook your rice in a tomato sauce, so it soaks up all the flavours.

As with all simple recipes, the devil is in the detail. So use the best ingredients you can afford, make sure you use long grain rice so it doesn’t go stodgy, and remember that the secret to great Jollof rice is investing in the flavours of the sauce. Some nations use coconut milk, others nutmeg or other earthy spices, some use partminger (an African basil leaf) and some even use Rooibos tea. Jamie has taken all these variations to heart and come up with his own kind of rice. It’s got lots of European twists in it to make it his own. That said, in Ghana it’s usually cooked using chicken and plenty of spice, so Jamie’s used chicken and 500g of seriously sweet roast tomatoes to give the rice that killer flavour – and a whole scotch bonnet chilli too, of course.

Mind you, the word Ghana means “warrior king”, so they can probably stand the heat.

Jamie’s twist on a Jollof rice recipe

Serves 6

ghana jollof rice

8 chicken thighs
1 tsp ground coriander
1 tsp ground white pepper
Vegetable oil
600g cherry tomatoes, on the vine
4 onions, finely chopped
6 garlic cloves, sliced
½ –1 scotch bonnet chilli, deseeded and chopped
A bunch of flat leaf parsley, leaves chopped, stalks finely chopped
2 tbsp tomato purée
500g vine-ripe tomatoes, chopped
750ml chicken stock
500g long grain rice
1 lemon, cut into wedges, to serve

Preheat the oven to 180ºC/350ºF/gas 4. In a bowl, toss the chicken thighs with the ground coriander, white pepper and a pinch of salt. Add a glug of oil to a large saucepan and fry the chicken over a medium heat for 7–8 minutes, until browned all over. Transfer the chicken to a medium-sized roasting pan and cook in the oven for 30–40 minutes, until golden, adding the cherry tomatoes to the pan halfway through.

Meanwhile, using the same pan you browned the chicken in, add a splash of oil and sauté the onions, garlic, chilli and parsley stalks over a low heat for 10 minutes. Stir in the tomato purée and chopped tomatoes, then pour in the chicken stock. Bring it to the boil, then reduce the heat to low and let it simmer for 5 minutes. Stir in the rice, pop the lid on and let it bubble away for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally, adding water if it gets too dry. Finally, stir in the parsley leaves followed by the cooking juices and cherry tomatoes (discarding the stalk) from the roasting pan. Mix well, squashing the tomatoes into the rice.

Serve the rice with the chicken pieces on top and lemon wedges on the side for squeezing over.

This recipe comes courtesy of Jamie Magazine, our gorgeous monthly mag full of recipes and travel writing from Jamie and the best chefs and writers in the world. For 50% off a year’s subscription, click here.

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Tags

ghana cuisine, jollof rice

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  • Guest

    What is hell is this. I am a west african woman and I find this extremely offensive. You have taken years of my west african culture and slaughter it with your makeshift recipe. Bye

    • GeeMoeNettie

      Hahaha! I was thinking the same thing!

    • HisMercy

      My people. Let’s CALM DOWN over this rice recipe, and just be happy that our beloved jollof got a little shine! haha! :) I’m reading these comments and seriously laughing! People are invoking their dead ancestors, and words like “bastardize” are being thrown around. lol. Let’s relax…it’s just rice.

      • PM

        HAHAHAHAHA!!!!

      • Kristin

        Right! I would be so thrilled if someone made this for me, especially if I lived somewhere where it’s sometimes hard to find a decent fucking tomato (the Midlands).

        • Mayowa

          be thrilled all you want but daris not jollof

          • Akpokevwe

            My dear sister, when ever someone cooks a meal that is not their culture a part of their culture enters the food, i can beg this meal Jamie prepped dey better pass, even me mama back home prepps her jorrof similarly garnished like this

          • FSFFF

            Jamie has made a good effort.

            We are happy & Content with the current version of our Jollof Rice and don’t mind a twist or interpretation as long as it can still be RECOGNISED as Jollof rice not risotto or paella….

          • Mayowa

            ehn thats why I said, be thrilled. I’m sure his creation will be tasty but you cannot call it something it is not. No tatashe, too much tomato ( and what is with the vine still attached), and only 1 scotch bonnet (aka rodo) haba. Garnish is one thing, jambalaya is another.

          • Sena

            Lol!

          • Stephanie (Nerd About Town)

            I’m so mad you wrote “daris” LMAOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!

          • Mayowa

            my sista daz the way I was feeling at the moment lol

          • Chichi Araba Boham

            looool breathe love, breathe!

      • barney23

        What exactly is a little “shine”? It’s food, it’s culture, it is identity. And jollof rice will remain jollof rice whether featured on whatever website or cooking show or not. This so-called “shine” you speak of, that is how they appropriate people’s stuff and dilute it until it’s unrecognisable. This is not jollof rice: they retain the rights to call it something else, not jollof.

      • Gold

        but that’s not Jollof. A multi-millionaire chef gets to BASTARDISE a recipe that would be laughed at mocked at otherwise.

      • Tunmi

        Nigerians foods, and foods of other cultures (African and otherwise) have already shined thanks to the Internet: avartsy cooking, Funke Koleosho, Dooneyskitchen, 9ja foodie. Abeg no come insult us oh over one yeye man

        • Kwabena Nucky Boateng

          check @TasteGhana on Instagram

        • Oceania Alfa

          Abi?

      • Akpokevwe

        my brother you correct, if they tell all these people we no like better think to return back to their home country, them, no go gree

    • FSFF

      He needs to invite a Nigerian chef to his show to teach him. If he goes through the process from beginning to end, he’ll rather eat it at a restaurant than attempt to cook it :)

      • Theodora

        Your not wrong, but I beg let him not srat on stew, because it would be off the chain.

    • A.Papas

      Who gives a f**k. Only naggers.

      • Abi

        If you are truly your mother’s child why not spell out the correct word? Racist bastard!

        • A.Papas

          You are the racist, not me.

          Watch the video.

          www urbandictionary com/define.php?term=naggers

          • Biod

            @ A. Papas….I bet your mother fuck a bastard before you were born. Asshole!!

          • A.Papas

            Shut up racist pig eater.

          • Biod

            Dipwit…

    • Anna Gueye

      Really! As a Senegalese what I find offensive is what has been done to our Thieboudiene (when done with fish) or Thiebouyapp (when done with meat) in West Africa.

  • Eastleigh Saint

    Easy off. Learn to share. Maybe you can put up your version. as the article says. the recipe is not owned by one person. everybody has a variation

    • Theodora

      It is many West Africans national dish.

  • sugzshay

    No no no this is joll- NOT rice. For shame. My ancestors did not die for this nonsense. First Marco Pierre white with his nonsense ‘rice and peas’ now this?

    What next pounded yam made with SMASH. -_-

    • guest

      dont Africans make fried rice different from the chinese, or are you just too ignorant to see that?

      • Guest

        @sugzshay…have you ever had fried rice in West Africa (GHANA OR NIGERIA)…IF YOU EVER HAD YOU’D UNDERSTAND WHY EVEN THE CHINESE ARE SUCH BIG FANS OF IT.

        WE DON’T MAKE FRIED RICE AND SAY ITS CHINESE FRIED RICE…OO NO, IF WE CANNOT MAKE A NATIONS DISH WE WOULDN’T TRY A MEAGER ATTEMPT AND SLAP THE COUNTRIES NAME ON IT AND CALL IT “GHANAIAN JOLLF”

        @sugzshay…don’t let me invoke the wrath of the #jollof_gods on you…if you really want to appreciate the delicacy that has brought both joy and heartbreak to millions of West Africans you will try proper JOLLOF RICE with what we Ghanaians call “KANZO” (The burnt under-part of the rice)

        • sugzshay

          Easy o. You dey gone crazy Jare. Where did you see me promoting this nonsense rice as our own, or comparing it to our jollof.

          Was not me. Read before you type. Dis proper jollof you speak of is the only I know recipe passed down from my Nigerian great grandmother. The smokey/burnt parts are the best.

          All the people with their wahala nonsense that this is a variation it is nothing even the same. Ah ah these oyinbo people always trying to take what is ours and make it their own.

          Let him call it tomato rice, red rice or whatever but this is NOT jollof or any variation of it in the slightest.

          • Matt

            wow! Really, I’ve had a lot of Jollof, my wife is Nigerian(Igbo), friends are from all over west Africa and each Jollof is different some better than others! But the only thing that is constant is rice, seasoning(all different), tomato and pepper! He has all of the ingredients, maybe he made it a bit too western for your liking but that’s life foods evolve, I bet the past generations will think your Jollof is not true to what they expect. Grow up and progress……..

          • FSFFF

            We are happy & Content with the current version of our Jollof Rice and don’t mind a twist or interpretation as long as it can still be RECOGNISED as Jollof rice not risotto or paella….

      • Theodora

        We don’t make fried rice, Jollof rice is a West African tradition, that is never ever fried.

        • guest

          ummmm what are you talking about?, yes we do make fried rice and its delicious

          • Theodora

            I am Nigerian never have. I have had only and have made Jollof rice. Is fried rice the poor man’s Jollof?

          • guest

            i am Nigerian too!!! and fried rice and jollof rice are two different meals since you need to be educated on that, and please please dont act like you dont know Nigerians make fried rice too and they are damn good at it!

          • Theodora

            Who is acting?

          • Chichi Araba Boham

            lol Thoedora, i’m half Nigerian and even i know they make fried rice A LOT. stop being pretentious, u know it too. we might not like the excuse for Jollof up there but no need to front sis lol.

          • Theodora

            In my house we never had fried rice fullstop, I know how to make it very well, goes for stew and soups,. never had fried rice.

      • FSFF

        Africans don’t call it Chinese fried rice, just fried rice.

        • guest

          wait so if he just called it jollof rice you would all relax? is that what you are telling me?

          • FSFFF

            We are happy & Content with the current version of our Jollof Rice and don’t mind a twist or interpretation as long as it can still be RECOGNISED as Jollof rice not risotto or paella

      • Elleeeeeeeeeeeeee

        Fried rice is rice that is fried – hence the name.
        Jollof rice is based on a traditional way of cooking with specific spices. Jamie’s recipe is not a Jollof rice recipe. It is a Jollof INSPIRED recipe. Two very different things!!

        Next time, look at yourself and think before you call a whole nation of people ignorant.

    • FSFF

      He needs to invite a Nigerian chef to his show to teach him. If he goes through the process from beginning to end, he’ll rather eat it at a restaurant than attempt to cook it

    • Steven Lin

      Sure cause thats what your ancestors were fighting for their food recipes. Clearly you don’t know what your ancestors were fighting for!

  • COG

    I think any attempt to try and cook another country’s dish is a great attempt – I know for sure my Green Thai Curry sauce does not taste exactly like Busaba’s but there are some slight errors in this and sadly you’re not getting the best of this dish. Can I offer to show you how we cook it in Ghana, perhaps cook it our way so you can taste it?! Well done for trying though!

    • Tunmi

      But will you as a whole international chef oh (not just mama Bisi buka oh) a whole international chef claim your personal green thai curry as authentic. Abeg, make we call a spade a spade.

      • sugzshay

        A whole international chef. Tumni you will not kill me o. LMAO

    • FSFF

      He needs to invite a Nigerian chef to his show to teach him. If he goes through the process from beginning to end, he’ll rather eat it at a restaurant than attempt to cook it….

  • Qameel

    My dear Sir, this(whatever this is) is ABSOLUTELY NOT Jollof Rice…you can call it “rice cooked in chicken broth” or something but definitely NOT Jollof Rice. Don’t use your limited (more like NON-EXISTENT)knowledge of a people’s culture to bastardize their food and then proceed to slap their name on it. It is just not done….

  • peaches

    Well he said he was “inspired” by jollof, and its many variations.. so this is Jamie’s Jollof as opposed to.. ahem.. REAL jollof..lol
    I admire him for trying. Too many established chefs have a superiority complex about african cusinine. They assume only french school or italian school of cooking can be fine dining.
    But Jamie coulda come see my mama first.. lol

  • jamieoliverdotcom

    This is Jamie’s twist on Jollof rice, which as it says it the feature can differ from nation to nation, “some using coconut milk, others nutmeg or other earthy spices, some use partminger (an African basil leaf) and some even use Rooibos tea” Lots of Jamie’s recipes are inspired by traditional recipes but with his own twist and style. This is his interpretation of brilliant and well-loved recipe. Let us know what you put in yours!

    • Kwabena Nucky Boateng

      Ah well its his take on it. Doesnt look good though… For more
      inspiration or if you love African food or Ghana Food check me out on
      Instagram @TasteGhana am a food blogger

      • http://www.irenesconciergeblog.com/ irenesconcierge

        real marketer lol

        • Kwabena Nucky Boateng

          Each opportunity mustn’t be missed. lol

          • http://www.irenesconciergeblog.com/ irenesconcierge

            sure, chaly way to go! lol

    • Adaukwu

      Nutmeg gini!! Which kind place uses NUTMEG in jollof. Sir, just admit your mess up and rename this thing. Nonsense rubbish

    • Amena Imasekha

      Fantastic. Coconut Milk sounds so interesting. :-)

    • Toks

      If you want to cook African food ask them how don’t just make crap up as you go and call it a twist……………and yes we know your surname is Oliver but our Jollof rice is no Dickens story #BehaveYourself shio

    • Guest

      Sir, please disregard the ignorant people who clearly do not know how to read and comprehend. I clearly understand what you did. I am West African, and I have my special spice that I add to my Jollof rice, that makes its taste unique to me. I am glad to see that you have been inspired by a West African dish, well done!

      • FSFF

        Africans are not Ignorant. If serve you “Egusi soup” without the Egusi (ground melon seed), is it still Egusi??!!

        Good attempt though. “Bell Peppers” are a very important ingredient I noticed he missed; they give the nice red Jollof rice colour.

        Jamie’s process is really different; think Bread vs Cake (one takes a little more time & care)

        Please ask Mr. Jamie Oliver to invite a Nigerian chef to his show to teach him how to cook Jollof rice (or as Nigerian kids also say; Party rice).

        If he goes through the whole process from beginning to end, he’ll rather eat it at a restaurant than attempt to cook it :) .

    • J.O’K

      but no supermalt mentioned tho???

    • FSFF

      Good attempt though. “Bell Peppers” are a very important ingredient I noticed he missed; they give the nice red Jollof rice colour.

      Jamie’s process is really different; think Bread vs Cake (one takes a little more time & care)

      Please ask Mr. Jamie Oliver to invite a Nigerian chef to his show to teach him how to cook Jollof rice (or as Nigerian kids also say; Party rice).

      If he goes through the whole process from beginning to end, he’ll rather eat it at a restaurant than attempt to cook it :) .

  • Obie Akpachiogu

    Come on guys! He was only kidding!

    • FSFF

      Your comment got me laughing!! (I hope others understood it the way I did) hehehehee…….lol

  • Pookie_sama

    KEYWORD: INSPIRED!!!!!! He never said it WAS Jollof rice.

    • shox

      The keyword should be in the title too. There is only ONE Jollof rice. No one can personalize it like Akua’s Jollof rice or (ahem!) JAMIE’s Jollof rice. I can’t even recognize that food!

  • kuks

    so I saw this .. thought was really cool… dressed up ready to cook and read it… :(

  • Daniel Asamoah

    I like this. Like the fact that little research was done an added to the article. There are many different variations but the main jist is Rice soaked by a tomato sauce. We hate Long grain rice and use Thai rice. It’s tricky to use but brings out the best flavours. Truss me.

  • Sandra

    I am liking the twist on Jollof rice that Jamie has done, but i would love to invite him round to taste the Authentic Ghanaian way of making this dish. let me know if our up for it Jamie Oliver. Its really nice to see that African food is getting out there.

  • kwame

    no maggi cube? or?? lol

    • Akpokevwe

      bros, maggi is dangerous to the health, besides you can have a successful meal without maggi, Maggi is only a fast-track

      • FSFFF

        I agree with you, some people even use crafyish as a substitute.

        We appreciate Jamie’s effort but on the 1st look, it doesn’t look like Jollof rice.

        We are happy & Content with the current version of our Jollof Rice and don’t mind a twist or interpretation as long as it can still be RECOGNISED as Jollof rice not risotto or paella….

        • Akpokevwe

          Risotto is juicy, he could have done that and called it another name, shebe, but from the story he said

          • FSFFF

            I perceive you do not even know your way around the kitchen but you’re just mashing up different articles (or WORSE, the words of other people) on this comments section so you come across as smart to everyone.

            We appreciate Jamie’s effort. We don’t mind a twist or different interpretation as long as it can still be RECOGNISED as Jollof rice not risotto or paella….

          • Sena

            I was trying to find a twist to my Jollof rice, I am leaving more confused that when I arrived. Lol.

      • kwame

        Thanks for the tip bro

  • fififlowerpots

    Please don’t appropriate my culture to sell your wares. Why don’t you
    give some space for the up and coming African chefs, many of them
    Ghanaians, to put this recipe out there for the masses and get
    themselves some exposure in the process.

    • pfkgp

      wait, so only Africans get to cook rice? you know rice wasnt even ours to start with right? O.o

      • disqus_d54W6hZ8TA

        But Jollof is ours. If you’re going to cook it then cook it well. Period

        • guest

          whats the Period?? im west African and i bet we dont cook jollof rice the exact same way! every chef has their own version and ways they make different meals, why is it only Africans that have to be so dramatic and negative about everything! its disgusting! look at our countries for crying out loud, that is why its so hard for us to progress and its soo sad because we are brilliant people

          • fififlowerpots

            Only Africans are so dramatic about these types of issues because only Africans have had our history whitewashed and our culture continuously stolen/appropriated or denied us by another group. We are the only group in the history of the world to have had our cultural identity maligned in the systematic way that history has illustrated in order to de-humanise us and treat us as chattel or second class in the global community. The stolen works of African art in the British Museum is a good example of this. So yes, it is about time that we are left alone to benefit off of the things that we have created whether through simple appreciation of our cuisine or our chefs having the ability to introduce our cuisine to the world and receive some shine and money for it themselves.

          • guest

            alot of races have been ‘de-humanised’ over the course of history, some more than others, yes we understand it was a tragedy that the world could have done without, but what good does it do if we hold on to that? none! we need to learn to evolve and make the best of a horrible situation rather than letting it define us because all that does is bring anger and hate for example for something as simple as rice, take a second and read all the comments being made, its mostly negativity, i am west African, all my life i whiteness Africans always bringing everything including themselves down , why? i for one am sick and tired of it, so if everyone else wants to go ahead and create a bad situation out of this, please be my guest,

          • fififlowerpots

            Maybe that would happen if colonialism wasn’t still going on under the guise of foreign policy and foreign aid. Maybe we could all move on if there wasn’t institutionalized racism keeping us in the same dark place and leaving us with limited access to education and little in the way of future prospects. Yes other races have been de-humanised, but none in the way that the African has been and continues to be. I am also a west African and what I witness is generation after generation of my people being lost because that divide and conquer tactic has not been resolved, we still don’t have the equal opportunities we need in education and employment in order to advance ourselves, and we are still treated as slaves even till this day. Why do you think they won’t cancel the debt owed that should never have been owed in the first place considering the African resources they used to fight both a second and first world war? It is to keep us in our place by keeping us poor. I would love to look forward with bright eyes and a happy heart, but when you see crowds throwing bananas at an African football player and calling him a monkey, you get a real sense of what Africans are really facing even in 2014. This isn’t just about a jollof rice recipe, it is about us having the voice to bring our own rich culture to the forefront and not having someone appropriate it in order to make money while the rest of the world calls us barbarians with no culture. Just so you know, I come from a lovely multicultural family and I don’t harbour hate to any individual that I do not know. But, it is naive at the least to ignore the systematic disenfranchisement of the African man and woman in the global community and the varying tactics, including cultural appropriation, that are used to keep him and her at the bottom of the social ladder and living in inequality.

          • guest

            i completely value other peoples opinion, because everyone has the right to say and feel the way they want to, there is absolutely nothing that i am going to say to you or anyone that would change their opinions clearly. If you see no point in moving forward that is also fine because its the way you feel, i choose to move on and not let it define me no matter how blatant. Racism has never stopped me and will never stop me from becoming who i want to be. I do agree with your statements about racism however just because people choose to be condescending does not mean i have to be the same because it wont make me a better person in anyway. And back to the subject of ‘jollof rice’ lol everyone has the right to cook what ever they want however they want and there is nothing anyone can do about that, i try to recreate different cultural foods (especially taco’s) in my kitchen all the time that doesnt mean i am trying to steal anything from anyone, it just means i love being creative. i love my culture to death and i love it when other people are curious about it too, i love to enlighten people about it and i dont get offended when people pronounce our words differently or cook my food different, i get happy for the fact that they actually tried it. jamie oliver tried a different cultural dish and gives credit to West Africa (which i dont understand how people keep implying that he’s trying to steal or claim it) yes its a different way he made it ( most chef’s tend to recreate different foods) i do not see that as a reason for people to get so irate and demeaning over.

          • fififlowerpots

            I also value other peoples opinions because without fluid discussion and an insight into the other persons thinking, we can never truly evolve or move forward as you have said. But, please don’t confuse my recognition of the very real power imbalance that African people have to contend with, as my inability or refusal to look forward or a desire to want to progress beyond this point. That desire to move forward is exactly why it is important to address these issues. Without addressing these very real and very destructive issues that affect us, we will never really move forward even if we want to because another group of people will always be there systematically keeping us back. No African can truly move forward while a global system forcefully keeps them back, and cultural appropriation is a part of that system. He’s benefiting from white privilege, from being the palatable face to introduce African cuisine into the mainstream instead of allowing an African chef to have the space in the market instead. It is a moral, political and social issue because of the historical context of the African man and woman’s struggle. Even if you as an individual have not felt held back, it is a proven fact that the African community globally is most definitely held back in every aspect of life. Because of the unique history of the African community, this is sadly, a big deal. Had we not the history that we have, then this most definitely wouldn’t be as big a deal as it is. This however is a small part of a much wider problem. But anyway, as you said, we all have our own opinion on this.

      • fififlowerpots

        Jollof rice and rice as a produce are two very different things. Traditional recipes from a specific cultural background are a representation of that culture and intrinsic part of cultural identity.

  • http://www.ualacs.org ualacs

    interesting that my previous comment wasn’t approved. Is there a reason for this?… And I agree with the maggie cube comment!!

  • ewucanbeer

    Please it is not just rice!

  • Kwabena Nucky Boateng

    Ah well its his take on it. Doesnt look good though… For more inspiration or if you love African food or Ghana Food check me out on Instagram @TasteGhana

  • sheeposaurus1 .

    It’s his version of the recipe. He has versions of every culture’s recipes… It’s not like the Jamie’s Italian restaurants sell traditional italian food, they sell his versions of the dishes.

  • MR APPIAH

    I respect you for attempting this very complex dish. But with all due respect where is the meat on that chicken?

    • Chichi Araba Boham

      hahahahahahhahaahaha ask him

  • DANIEL

    prik

  • DANIEL

    absolute nonsense

  • MR APPIAH

    THIS IS JUST BLASHPHEMY! IF I EVER CATCH YOU ON ROAD EHN?!

    • sugzshay

      Pahahahahahahahahahahaha

    • FSFF

      Lol……He needs to invite a Nigerian chef to his show to teach him. If he goes through the process from beginning to end, he’ll rather eat it at a restaurant than attempt to cook it :)

      • MR APPIAH

        No im Ghanaian! he needs to invite a Ghanaian chief. Basmati only!

  • Amena Imasekha

    Jollof Rice is one of my favourite Nigerian dishes and this is a great take on it. The first thing I thought when I saw this is WOW this looks amazing. Consequently, I’ll be making this dish soon.

  • jAyajade

    Nice!! interesting twist…. this Nigerian will be trying this soon. :)

    • Jellof_man

      try it at your own risk. if you like even add the coconut milk.

  • disqus_iS8OW5cxx1

    This is just wrong in so many ways… research was done into what Ghana means etc but seems like you didn’t do research on the dish. This is not worthy to be called jollof rice…

  • disqus_iS8OW5cxx1

    LOOOL he also said “make sure you use long grain rice” this gets worse and worse

    • Theodora

      This comment made me choke, it was so funny.

  • pdbraide

    sigh. btw rice with coconut milk in these parts is actually called coconut rice not jollof rice. well its your take on the dish Jamie… it isnt jollof rice

    • Jaycee

      Err… there’s no coconut in that recipe

  • Nefetiti

    I like it, it’s a twist but he kept to the principle of the dish, I can’t see why people would get bent out of shape over this, it’s better than some of the other recipes people try to pass off as Jolloff.

  • Toks

    Jamie Oliver and people manning this website or blog the thunder that will fire you is doing press ups………..as a Nigerian I think my Ghanian brothers and sisters will agree when I say KWASIA kmt

    Leave our dishes alone

    • FSFF

      lol…; ” the thunder that will fire you is doing press ups”……too much, lol….

      • 100%Black

        Yeah..lol. he killed it

      • George Love

        lol….thunder doesn’t strike, it is lightning that strikes….so if thunder is doing press ups, then the universe must be really mad…..lol ….

        Oh challey…all because of one jollof rice!….lol

    • ILoveGhana

      hahahaha u guys are killing me with your comments…

    • Chichi Araba Boham

      hahaahahahahaha una get mouth! chai!!

  • Toks

    Coriander, parsley and lemon wedge? You done craze we don’t use that crap and we blend our tomatoes and peppers not eat it whole.

    Where is the curry powder, thyme, crayfish powder and maggi cubes? Chai Diaris God o.

    Don’t put twist to centuries of tradition stick with your English food before I send Shango, Ogun and Obatala to smite you shio

    • ItsNeverThatSerious

      haha so “maggi cubes” have been here for centuries too right? lol so maggi cubes are a tradition too now? lol

      • guest

        i know right!!!!!! this page is just full of ignorant Africans. I am very happy this was featured.

        • simba213

          Ignorant of what exactly?

          • guest

            IGNORANT because it clearly states its he’s own twist on the recipe, but most people choose to ignore that part, because they rather rant and rave and use such words as ‘abomination’. its almost funny

          • abdlazeez

            its meant to be funny, i doubt if even jamie will take any of the comments as more than banter. c’mon mate.. its just food.

          • guest

            yea your right, i just need to calm down lol im just tired of negativity

          • Dasha

            He clearly says it’s HIS TWIST on this dish. If West Africans tried to recreate an American apple pie but couldn’t have access to granny smith apples, no one would be offended if you subbed another type of fruit entirely…or added your own cultural spices!

            And crayfish powder? That’s not something you can easily find in the US.
            How tragic that Jamie didn’t blend his peppers and tomatoes…oh the horror…

          • mesmorino

            If you want to put your own “twist” on an American Apple pie, but then use another fruit entirely and then add in other things, by definition it is no longer an “apple pie”, and it may not necessarily even be *American*, if you decide to add non-standard ingredients.

            At that point you have gone past putting your twist on it and made something totally different. If I boil some sliced potatoes and boil some fish and serve it with a lemon wedge, is it then fair to call that concoction “fish and chips?” Or how about if I use Walkers crisps and bake the fish, what about that? After all, Americans call crisps “chips”, so surely it’s still “fish and chips”, right?

            Please. Putting his twist on it is not the problem, lots of people already do that- Even I don’t make jollof rice the same way my mum does, but both meals are still identifiably jollof. The problem is that he’s made something completely different and is calling it Jollof. It is especially egregious because all he had to do was ASK a number of Africans who know how to make it, and they would have told him to swerve this nonsense.

          • Gold

            Thank you. A European twist totally takes away it’s Africanness. Everyone knows Jollof Rice is African

          • Sena

            Actually spanish people have something quite similar. I think though, that the test is in the pudding.
            You can tell what the twist is from the taste.

          • 100%Black

            Ignorant???? It’s light hearted banter. Grow a sense of humour..

        • Theodora

          How is that we are ignorant in something we are proficient at. The ignorance is the abomination mascerading as our national dish.

        • FSFF

          Africans are not Ignorant.

          Jamie has made a good attempt but his process & end product are different from what is generally known as Jollof rice. Think bread vs Cake, similar ingredients & process but different end result.

        • Efia

          The only ignorant person here is YOU.

          • FSFFF

            She is Not Ignorant, she has spoken correctly.

            You can dispute what she has said without being aggressive Efia (you’re Ghanian?..) or are you not educated enough to make a logical argument?

            We appreciate Jamie’s effort.

            We are happy & Content with the current version of our Jollof Rice and don’t mind a twist or interpretation as long as it can still be RECOGNISED as Jollof rice not risotto or paella….

        • FSFFF

          Not being able to Recognise the picture above as Jollof rice, does NOT make Africans ignorant.

          We appreciate Jamie’s effort but on the 1st look, it doesn’t look like Jollof rice.

          We are happy & Content with the current version of our Jollof Rice and don’t mind a twist or interpretation as long as it can still be RECOGNISED as Jollof rice not risotto or paella….

      • Sena

        I like mine a little burnt.

    • FSFF

      Lol…He needs to invite a Nigerian chef to his show to teach him. If he goes through the process from beginning to end, he’ll rather eat it at a restaurant than attempt to cook it :)

  • Toks

    This is not Jollof rice this is risoto you this goat

    • FSFF

      Come to think of it, very similar to risotto……..

  • Guest

    I’m a Ghanaian woman and I know plenty of Ghanaians that use nutmeg in their jollof so he’s right there. However, this seems more like paella than jollof rice. I’d pass.

  • SteveBiko

    I’m Namibian, and even I can see that this sorry excuse for a dish doesn’t even LOOK like Jollof Rice! How dare you sully the name of this very TASTY dish that my African brethren have perfected over the years? Total shame. Look at the chicken bone, there isn’t even any meat on it! This is heresy! My ancestors didn’t die for this!

    • FSFF

      Lol…..

  • Gold

    This actually looks really good but it’s not Jollof or even similar to the Ghanaian recipe so not sure how it’s ‘inspired’ by Ghana. No you don’t get to put your name on a culture’s dish and completely fuck it up. I get that this is a variation but he’s a world renowned millionaire chef. Try harder. Gordon Ramsay traveled to India before even trying to attempt their dishes. Anyway bout to put beef and bread together and call it a Mexican burrito.

    • WhyDoYouNeedMyName

      This made my day!!!! thanks you whoever you are!!!!! “mexican burrito”!!!!!! LMAO

    • Chichi Araba Boham

      hahahahaahahha how about stew and meat on sliced bread and you hve a Pizza. think abt it

      • Gold

        Lol yeah. Let my Black ass start a blog with my stew pizzas. I’M JUST CHANGING CULTURE LMFAO

  • http://akuamercy.blogspot.com/ abbi shabbi

    i’m ghanaian and it looks delicious to me. that chicken drumstick is driving nuts. i’d tap dat!

  • Pearlynb

    I love this, thank you Jamie for trying your hand at this! It’s okay to put our own interpretation of a recipe, its fun to get creative and hey, be inspired. LIVE a lot. Food is to be enjoyed! :-D Some of the commenters on this page need a great meal and a cup of tea.

    • Jellof_man

      I am shocked how you would regard this as creative. He absolutely destroyed what we consider Jellof rice. What he has prepared is just Tomato sauce rice. People, he got it wrong and that is the end of the discussion. Why do we have to pat a professional chef on the back for getting a popular recipe wrong. Going on to call it one pot. Indeed
      Please spare me the stories on how he is celebrating our culture, We do not need him to celebrate it, We know our worth.

  • jollof warrior

    Eh, this man has no fear oh. Charlie, let me tell you this: you can take slaves away from the coast, colonise us, give us aid and take our oil and mineral, refuse us a visa, look down on us but if you touch our jollof rice, walaiyi, there would be war, brimstone, fire and
    pestilence deadlier than Ebola! So Jamie, next time think hard before you touch a West African’s food!

    • esther woode

      omg!!! u totally made my week!!!!

    • FSFF

      Oh my…lol

    • ILoveGhana

      hahahaa pestilence dealier than ebola? wow Jamie be afraid be very afraid!!!

    • Chichi Araba Boham

      haahaahahaaahaha you just killed me

  • Kaley

    I’m proud to see this in all honesty. It’s nice when people try something different and attempt at understanding different foods and cultures. I’m mortified that some people feel it appropriate to make threats and slurs, it’s absolutely ridiculous and it needs to stop. I’m 100% sure that everyone who cooks/eats Jollof Rice cooks it a different way and expects it to taste different. I’m a British Nigerian and I’ve tried all sorts of Jollof, Ghanian Jollof is actually quite different to Nigerian Jollof. So does that make Nigerian Jollof wrong? I mean, where does it stop? I’m sure that if tables were turned and a West Africa-born chef posted a recipe for ‘A Roast Dinner’, but put a spin on it, and people called him or her a ‘fool’ and said he or she ‘bastardised’ the recipe, many would accuse them of being racist…

    • Lola Faith

      That is exactly true, some of these comments are really disturbing, it seems that we are our own enemies of progress… Jamie clearly stated that it was a British spin on the jollof…. what’s the outrage about, I’m sure most of us cook dishes from other continents. I’m Nigerian and I certainly do!

      • Gold

        He never said that. He stated that it was Ghana inspired. This is not jollof and he has no right of colonising a dish

        • Lola Faith

          He said his version had ‘lots of European twists to make it’s own’ what’s wrong with that

          • Gold

            But why does he need to make it his own. ‘European twists’ means it’s no longer African. Colonise our foods like our lands,I guess

      • FSFF

        If serve you “Egusi soup” without the Egusi (ground melon seed), is it still Egusi??!!

        Good attempt though. “Bell Peppers” are a very important ingredient I noticed he missed; they give the nice red Jollof rice colour.

        Jamie’s process is really different; think Bread vs Cake (one takes a little more time & care)

        Please ask Mr. Jamie Oliver to invite a Nigerian chef to his show to teach him how to cook Jollof rice (or as Nigerian kids also say; Party rice).

        If he goes through the whole process from beginning to end, he’ll rather eat it at a restaurant than attempt to cook it :) .

    • Gold

      I’m sure the West African wouldn’t be saying the roast dinner was British inspired because ‘roast dinner’ is international. He wouldn’t be intentionally trying to covet a region’s food and then ruin it.

      • Kaley

        Okay, before you attempt to state facts, you should do some research. Traditional Roast Dinner, is a concept originally from the UK and Ireland, I’m talking Sunday roast – meat and veg, you know? But anyway, pretending that your point is valid, roast is enjoyed around the world and so is Jollof rice. Jollof rice is eaten amongst the Afro-Caribbean community around the world, as well as many other people. I cannot understand why you feel the need to be so defensive about a British spin put on a rice dish. You say it has been ruined, but I mean have you tasted it? Underneath the garnish it actually looks like any other Jollof rice…

        • FSFF

          Africans are not Ignorant. If serve you “Egusi soup” without the Egusi (ground melon seed), is it still Egusi??!!

          Good attempt though. “Bell Peppers” are a very important ingredient I noticed he missed; they give the nice red Jollof rice colour.

          Jamie’s process is really different; think Bread vs Cake (one takes a little more time & care)

          Please ask Mr. Jamie Oliver to invite a Nigerian chef to his show to teach him how to cook Jollof rice (or as Nigerian kids also say; Party rice).

          If he goes through the whole process from beginning to end, he’ll rather eat it at a restaurant than attempt to cook it :)

          • isima atamenwan

            Oga Jamie, nice one but truely this ya jollof rice is really twisted. This doesnt look like jollof rice biko! Next time when you want to cook a meal from africa, just get a good african cusine chef and not come up with any kind of funny twist. Originality is key. Thanks.

        • Gold

          Was this a well thought out paragraph? Do you not know how to piece together an argument? Do you know how to infer. No way, did I say Jamie Oliver ruined it. In fact, I think it looks fairly beautiful and tasty.I think there’s a sharp difference between potatoes and chicken and jollof rice. ‘Eating a large roast meal following church services is common to all of Europe and other countries with a Christian heritage’.When an African chef even recreates or appropriates ‘roast dinner’, then we can debate but fuck off with the imaginary examples, let’s talk about right here and now. Hell tons of African chefs wouldn’t even get the recognition for something they’ve been doing for years which is part of my annoyance. Jollof rice is not ‘Afro-Carribean’ IT’S AFRICAN…It’s eaten amongst African communities, hell mostly eaten amongst WEST AFRICAN communities. The Zimbabweans and Somalians don’t get care too much for it. We’re not a monolith. Also, I’m not defensive so don’t throw lofty words at me I just don’t need to pretend we’re all singing kumbaya we are all one people bullshit. If a MULTI MILLIONAIRE chef is to do something, he has to do it right. He is making money of a bastardised recipe. Gordon Ramsay travelled to India before trying to recreate their recipes.

        • Gold

          Do you know how to constuct an argument or piece together a sentence OR READ? I never said he ruined it. I think it looks tasty and scrumptious. Plus roast is nothing special ‘Eating a large meal following church services is common to all of Europe and other countries with a Christian heritage’ Hell if an African chef recreated roast, you’d get tons of angry White people claiming how their tradition has been ruined and how the immigrants are taking over. Jollof is unique to West Africa. Other regions of Africa aren’t too keen on it. Some parts of the African diaspora have their own variations due to slavery and such. But it’s primarily west african. Couldn’t he have done his research like Gordon Ramsay did when he went to India. This is a bastardisation and a mockery to those who spent decades perfecting the recipe. Food is sensitive to tons of people. My Italian boyfriend will cry if I tried to recreate a spaghetti cabornara with fish, barbecue sauce etcetera..because these are recipes people perfected, in their villages, in their homes. It’s special to them so it deserves some respect

          • Kaley

            You might just have a short memory, but you did say that he “intentionally tried to covet a region’s food and then ruin it”, but anyway that’s beside the point. There is NO PLACE on Earth that you will find Jollof rice cooked how it was originally cooked, so you can lay that point to rest right now. The concept of Jollof rice is rice, boiled and soaked in a tomato stew with added spices and flavours; judging by the recipe this dish is exactly that with a few added extras. Ask your “Italian boyfriend” about original Italian pizza, ask him to compare it to the pizza around the rest of the world. He will 100% tell you that it is very different, but the original concept is still there. If you frown upon this recipe and insist that our precious Jollof rice has been bastardised, then you frown upon every single home recipe that has been changed and adapted over the years. If everybody did that then no one would ever experience anything different. Can you not see how little sense it makes to stress over a rice recipe? At the end of the day, if you don’t like it – don’t cook it!

          • Gold

            You are seriously stupid. Like really fucking stupid. I frown upon every home recipe that has been changed OVER THE YEARS? No I frown upon a chef not cooking a recipe that he’s trying to promote properly. What people do in their own homes is their business. You want to put Ketchup in your ‘Thai Green curry’ that’s your business. If you want to be a chef and add mayonnaise to That Green curry and then claim it’s because ‘cultures change’ then you’re a fucking culture vulture.But to have a capital and to not do proper research is shambles to me.Nor did you address my multiple points. . My boyfriend will tell you that the ‘pizza’ has been revamped and remade, but that it no longer makes it Italian pizza. American pizza is different to Italian pizza. Ghanaian rice and peas is different to Jamaican rice and peas- unique recipes unique to a region. Don’t be a patronising git by insinuating I’m upset over rice. I’m upset over misrepresentation, lack of research and effort.

          • Gold

            Every cultural group would be upset by a millionaire chef taking their beloved recipe and fucking it up. Just like Marco Pierre’s take on Jamaican rice and peas’. It was a fucking shambles. Ever watch come dine with me? Have multicultural friends? See the care and delicacy they take in preparing their foods. See how important roast is to Brits? Go to an Italian restaurant and merely PRONOUNCE one of their recipes wrong? Stop devaluing the importance of food, the cultural history behind them in people’s lives.

            Yes culture evolves. But Jamie is not African, he’s not going to evolve it.

    • Guest

      Thank God you put British first before Nigeria, what else do I have to say. Bye

      • Kaley

        Ohh please. Give it a rest, the level of immaturity that you must posses to insult my sense of culture must be ridiculously high. What you need to do is grow up.

  • Funlola

    Instead of us West Africans screaming our heads off because of a recipee gone wrong, lets offer a little help to readers who might be interested in this recipee. Not like we haven’t eaten disastrous sponge cakes from twisted recipes in the name of “it’s ok, sponge cakes originated from the west”.
    there are literally a thousand and one ways to cook jollof rice. i can bet that there are as many recipees as the number of households. households seem to have personalised the recipee to suit their own preferences.
    what would matter at the end of the day would be the look, and the taste. unfortunately there is limited space to type the process with. but it’s important to take off the pepper and tomato stems, then blend the onions, tomatoes and pepper in a blender so you don’t end up with the clunky unappetising peppers in the photo above. it’s also important to drain the ‘starchiness’ of the rice by boiling it for about 5minutes, and then draining the water using a colander. choice of chicken, meat, fish etc to go with the meal is purely personal and optional.
    jollof rice recipee:
    ingredients
    500 grams of long grain rice
    30 grams of chilli pepper (or a the large sized red peppers 40 grams)
    8 large tomatoes
    7 large onions
    7 tiny cubes of seasoning (4 if using large cubes)
    meat or chicken stock (50 ml)
    salt (1 teaspoon)
    salt to taste
    cooking oil (200 ml)
    thyme leaves ( 1 teaspoon)
    curry (1 teaspoon)
    ground dry pepper (optional)
    tomato paste

    • Gold

      he doesn’t need our help. his wealthy white ass could have used google all along

    • FSFF

      Thanks for offering this recipe.

      Jamie’s process is really different; think Bread vs Cake (one takes a little more time & care)

      If he goes through the whole process from beginning to end, he’ll rather eat it at a restaurant than attempt to cook it :) .

    • Yinka

      Thank you, ma’am.
      Jolloff has evolved, and will continue to evolve. Growing up, it was not made with Basmati at all (“Basma…what?”, but now there are very yummy versions made with Basmati. Some put crayfish, my mother never did, and I don’t. Some cook all the tomato base completely then add partially boiled rice, others put raw washed rice very early in the cooking process.
      If you are in Lagos, there is the “Ghana high” version. Various “party” / iya Risi versions, cooked on charcoal for that smoky flavour. Don’t forget the dodo. And moin-moin. Ane several pieces of fried chicken, and/or beef/ fish. Doesn’t matter what meet, but it must be fried.
      And then a cold drink afterwards. Hmmmmn. About 5000 calories, but wonderful!

      Jamie’s recipe is Jamieloff. OK? No vex, people.

      • Chichi Araba Boham

        lol so we should accept that our jollof has evolved into cheap paella abi? can u cook that thing and give it to ur mother in-law and say it’s jollof? lol kudos to him for trying, hopefully next time, he’ll get it right but i beg stop that evolution “crap” that is how we evolve and lose our identity. you’re right about one thing tho, sooooo many types of jollof but this ain’t one my love. when will u cook ur twist for me? lol

  • Aminata

    What the fuss people relax….cook it your way. This way is for those African kids that never learned to cook when they are living with you and all of a sudden want to cook “African Food” in college. My days of cooking jollof rice on skype are over the recipe has been fowarded.

  • Win

    8 chicken thighs? I can only see 1 composite one, and those shreds sure look like they aren’t going to make up the remaining 7. Ma guy, where the rest of the chicken go pass?

  • Guest

    OMG! What’s wrong with we West Africans? Can we read at all? He said “INSPIRED”., not that he is recreating our Jollof rice. He called it Jamie’s Jollof rice. Is it that all of you cook Jollof rice the exact same way? I have seen people add peas and carrots to theirs, some use bay leaves, some do not, etc.
    Please lets behave like people who can read and comprehend. As for those taking the issue to court, wow! they have a lot of time and money on there hands. Please they should go find where they can volunteer since they really have nothing to do but sue someone for not cooking with Maggie. He even acknowledged that this is an African recipe that he has personalized.
    People please get a life!

    • FSFF

      I guess you’ve missed the fun everyone’s having poking fun at Jamie’s version of Jollof rice.

      Sometimes, Nigerians add mixed vegetables not just peas to home-made Jollof rice. He’s made a good attempt though

  • Chibueze Ogah

    Let’s just wait for “judgement day”. Somebody has to answer for this…smh!!!

    • FSFF

      I can’t…lol…..

  • ME

    they want to wipe us out (EBOLA)
    they want to wipe our culture out (JAMIE OLIVER)

    LET US FIGHT THE POWER
    HAHAHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHA

    • FSFF

      lol…..this is too much……lol…

  • Naija Cooking Sauce

    It is important to note that one upon a time, African food was regarded as a no-no and had absolutely no place within the culinary cuture of the world.

    Secondly, many cuisines that are popular within the culinary culture of the world and undergo all types of adaptation to suit the palate of the various parts of the world they migrate to; even drinks such as coca cola anxd Mcdonalds burgers are cooked to suit the various palate of the various countries where they are sold.

    African food should expect to experience some degree of variation as it migrate from the hardland of Ashanti culture to Accra and then to the US and to Britain. Its called Evolution.

  • http://www.theecstaticflash.com Natasha A. Nyanin

    The recipe clearly states that Oliver has composed his variation on a theme so everyone needs to take a deep breath and stop making all this brouhaha over rice and bouillon cube! Creative licence is a part of all art, especially the art of crafting recipes. As is discussed in the post, jollof has evolved from country to country, ethnic group to ethnic group and even from home to home: my Ghanaian friends and I have friendly debates as to whether veggies have any place in the pot, for instance. Even Igbo jollof and Yoruba jollof (both Nigerian) are not the same. Think of jollof as a stock character and recognize that any and everyone has the right to render it in whatever incarnation they see fit. That’s what creativity and cooking is all about. Signed, A Ghanaian woman who puts peas in her jollof and nutmeg too!

    • FSFF

      I guess you’ve missed the fun everyone’s having poking fun at Jamie’s version of Jollof rice.

      Sometimes, Nigerians add mixed vegetables not just peas to home-made Jollof rice. He’s made a good attempt though.

      • http://www.theecstaticflash.com Natasha A. Nyanin

        Some of the comments are obviously facetious and those that are are HILARIOUS. A personal favourite is the “no maggie or?”. But the ones that are outright attacks take it too far.

        • FSFF

          I’ve been laughing while reading the comments, I guess some have taken the teasing a little too far but in the end, it’s just poking fun at Jamie.

          (If he wants to join the Jollof movement, he needs to become an African child, we’re tough cookies & take all the teasing etc with a bold face then cry later….lol)

  • jamieoliverdotcom

    If you’ve got a great Jollof rice recipe, we want to see it! Share your Jollof recipes, pictures and ideas with us in our forums: http://goo.gl/3xgnfV

    • FSFF

      Please ask Mr. Jamie Oliver to invite a Nigerian chef to his show to teach him how to cook Jollof rice (or as Nigerian kids also say; Party rice).
      If he goes through the whole process from beginning to end, he’ll rather eat it at a restaurant than attempt to cook it :)
      Good attempt though. “Bell Peppers” are a very important ingredient I noticed he missed; they give the nice red Jollof rice colour.

  • Stephen

    Kudos to you Jamie, I never knew “Jollof-rice” came from the Wollof people. However, I think you should have done a little more research on the food, especially the local style, (alternating the whole process seems kinda
    “too extreme” to me as well, just a just a little change to the whole process would have been much better) but for trying to personalize it in your own style, well I think its normal so far I can add any ingredient to my own “Jollof-rice” just to have the perfect taste. And for my fellow Africans, let us try to read in-between the lines, organize our thoughts and put it down in a reasonable manner, thank you.

    • Theodora

      Jollof rice didn’t just come from the Wollof people, it was present all over West Africa long before 1360. It comes from a time, when the whole of West Africa was one Empire.

  • Kingsley

    Nothing wrong here guys.

  • Kingsley

    It’s just Jamie’s rendition on Jollof rice. It’s like the Nigerians rendition of the Ghanian Jollof but who is complaining lol. Looks good to me and probably has added flavour.

    • Theodora

      If anything he had taken away flavour.

  • Nana Boateng

    hahahaha, first of all the comments are hilarious. Secondly, even all Africans make jollof differently. I hate some variations of it by other countries. Some don’t even look like the Ghanaian version I know. Yes, he “missed” some ingredients. Yes he added some other ones. But at the end of the day, they’ve put the food on a stage where it can be explored, researched and enjoyed by many. I love this!! But yes, don’t say it’s just rice..Jollof is NOT JUST RICE…it’s an evolution of the grain and should treated as such…don’t belittle such progress!

  • cythnia

    you jollof rice looks nasty you forgot to even add maggi cubes

    • FSFF

      I don’t think it’ll taste that bad.

  • Mayowa

    rotflmao at the people over here invoking their ancestors. but I feel your pain.. too much serenren not enough pepper

  • Mathew Warke

    I think west african food is beautiful and I am very surprised that it is not more famous in Europe. I live in Birmingham the 2nd biggest city in the uk and We have no West african restaurants but 100s of indian and chinese. I honestly think if British people tried West African food it would become very popular here and restaurants would start spinging up all over the place. Lots of WEst African people live here, they need to start opening their own restaurants

  • Naa Ameley

    I’m glad a high profile-cook attempted to make our beloved dish but I must say this is more of paella or breakfast pillaf than Jollof rice. Yes, essentially its all rice cooked in tomato puree and chicken broth, but once you replace African flavoring like Maggie cube with parsley, coriander and other western spices, you MUST change the name to a western name(i.e. paella) as the taste would change.People all over the world use similar ingredients but how they combine those ingredients and what they use is what makes the dishes different and native to those people. I need to call my mama, I miss her jollof!

  • David Griffith

    If this is not Jollof can someone post their own recipe.

    • FSFF

      Type Jollof Rice into google, you’ll be amazed by the resources you’ll find (a lot). Or visit a Nigerian restaurant, if you’ve never had Jollof rice before, then you’ll understand.
      Good attempt by Jamie though.

  • guest

    why do some Africans have to be enemies of progress, this is an amazing meal that is being featured by an amazing chef, but leave it to these hating Africans to bring it down like they do most good things. who cares if he didnt use maggie or whatever? i am west african born and raised and sometimes I dont even use maggie in my jollof rice and it still taste so delicious. I am not Indian but i make curry in my own way with other ingredients that arent in the original recipes. The point is Africans need to stop bringing people down and instead lift them up, even though its different from the way you see things. I for one am going to try he’s version (i bet all of you who are bringing it down haven’t even tried it) and im sure its going to be amazing!!

    • FSFF

      AFRICANS ARE NOT IGNORANT.

      YOU DO NOT ATTACH AN “ORIGINAL” NAME TO A COUNTERFEIT!!

      LIKE CALLING A VAUXHALL A BENTLEY!!?? NEVER.

      I SUGGEST A NAME; JAMIE RED RICE OR JAMIE TOMATOE RICE :)

      • guest

        and i agree it is different, almost everyone has stated that. i have tasted Ghana jollof rice and when i did, it tasted slightly different to me from what i usually eat back home in Nigeria non the less it still tasted great, i have tasted Korean style tacos and again it was different from the tacos i tasted at a Mexican restaurant. The point is we all have our different ways of doing and seeing things it doesnt mean anyone is trying to over take anyone. instead of being condescending why dont we try new things or if we dont want to try something new thats also ok, then lets put our own original version up, we dont have to demeaning to pass our message accross

    • Jellof_man

      I am sorry I do not agree with you. He absolutely got it wrong. The title states clearly Ghanaian Jellof rice. It does not say Jamie’s interpretation on Ghanaian Jellof rice.

      • guest

        “Jamie’s twist on a Jollof rice recipe”
        that’s what is written in the article right before the recipe is listed. feel free to go read it

  • Titilayo Soremi

    The recipe and picture presented got me cracking. Reading all the comments sealed my day with that sort of laughter that only Africans can imagine, invigorate and understand. This was a good attempt. However, there are several heresies that can be readily pointed out in this piece. A major one is the chopped scotch bonnet. We no dey ‘chop am like that at all at all o’ (meaning we don’t eat it like that). If you will like to collect jollof rice recipes for your discussion forum, several African chefs have videos on YouTube. You can readily contact these chefs so they can share their recipes with you. Afterwards, we will be glad to see you do a proper African nation-inspired jollof rice. And don’t forget to credit the African chefs you will be getting the accurate recipe from ‘ehn’.

  • Guest

    Hey Jamie i wont lie…that “jollof rice” that you made looks pretty appetizing. Still you technically cant call this food Jollof rice due to key ingredients that were taken away from this recipe. Hey! Still I give you props for attempting to try the recipe out.

    • FSFF

      I agree.

  • Oh Joe

    I just died from reading some comments here. hahaa ;D but on a more serious note that’s an overpolished version of Jollof rice. Seriously, lemon wedges? Nah bruh. And Wa guan fo that chicken leg man? lol

  • Rola

    I am very disappointed at people calling African’s ignorant. First of all you are the one that’s ignorant, judging an entire continent based on your mediocre knowledge of Africa. Anyways, He said it’s inspired by our jollof rice, and then calls it Ghanaian jollof rice in the title, those are two completely different things. It doesn’t in any way or form look like jollof rice, you can call it something like ” too much tomatoes with a few grains of rice and vegetables…oh look we found a lemon” and that would be perfect. But nope, you said Ghana: Jollof rice, and that’s why everyone is responding this way, we came to this site to be amazed at someone’s creation of our delicacy only to find a painting “with a little shine”.
    Dear Jamie Oliver, you are popular, we salute you for your great cooking, and that’s something African’s take serious: Cooking. But then, don’t become our nickname for someone who makes a delicious food look bad, taste bad and even un-eatable… eg.” Rita why are you behaving like Jamie Oliver, Can’t you just cook what we know as food, the kitchen is not a lab for your experiments”.

    I personally don’t care if you apologize or not, Just be sure to make exactly what the dish is next time you get inspired…

    Also some information in your write up is far from accurate, facts are facts, we don’t like your personal opinions been represented as facts.

    • FSFF

      PERFECT ANSWER.

      AFRICANS ARE NOT IGNORANT. ROLA, GOOD ANSWER: :)

      YOU DO NOT ATTACH AN “ORIGINAL” NAME TO A COUNTERFEIT!!

      LIKE CALLING A VAUXHALL A BENTLEY!!?? NEVER.

      I SUGGEST A NAME; JAMIE RED RICE OR JAMIE TOMATOE RICE :)

      • Jellof_man

        Rola, please tell them. What is Lemon doing in Jellof rice.
        Please tell them some more

    • mie

      you can call it something like ” too much tomatoes with a few grains of rice and vegetables…oh look we found a lemon” and that would be perfect.

      hahaha! that killed me. then the “Rita why are you behaving like Jamie Oliver” …lol… i think so far(going down) this is my fav contribution. well about “Just be sure to make exactly what the dish is next time you get inspired…” if it is “inspired” it may not be “exactly” what the dish is…

  • W V N Z V M

    I hope you guys realise you are making retarded comments….smh..It is fucking food and some of y’all are tripping bringing your ancestors and shid into this….SERIOUSLY WTF!!??

    • FSFF

      Join in the fun. We’re all teasing Jamie.

      Jamie’s process is really different, Good attempt though.

  • Irene Onwuchekwa

    I don’t know what y’all are getting mad about. what he described is pretty much how i make my jollof rice and its finger licking good. The only major diff is, i blend my tomatoes first, instead of squashing it into the rice. West Africans get a grip of yourselves please. good job johnny garrett

    • FSFF

      If I serve you “Egusi Soup” cooked with everything but Egusi (melon seeds), is it still Egusi Soup!!?? lol.

      Join in the fun. We’re all teasing Jamie.

      Jamie’s process is really different, Good attempt though.

      • Irene Onwuchekwa

        if its just teasing, then by all means carry on. but some people here really sounded really mad though

  • Theodora

    Do you want me to teach you how to make real jollof rice, that abheration is not cutting it. What’s with the lemon? It looks like saffron rice with an intermission and a puny drumstick on the side.

    • FSFFF

      Chill guys. Good Food Channel has a WORSE VERSION

  • Irene Onwuchekwa

    I don’t know what y’all are getting mad about. what he described is pretty much how i make my jollof rice and its finger licking good. The only major diff is, i blend my tomatoes first, instead of squashing it into the rice. West Africans get a grip of yourselves please. good job johnny garrett

  • Timisson

    My 12 year old cousin will not go wrong on this menu. You just killed centuries of hard labour in the West African kitchen.
    Highly overrated cook just like any other celebrity.

  • Stephen

    all right, but what about the word play –Wollof, Jollof…

  • Megan

    Hey folks – instead of just wailing about how this isn’t the way to make jollof why not tell me how to make it the traditional West African way, please.

    • FSFFF

      Hi Megan,
      Try searching for Dooneys kitchen on google ( dooneyskitchen ), she gives really good directions for different styles of Jollof rice and other Nigerian dishes too if you’re interested.

      Don’t worry if you don’t get it right the first time, it took me a while too :) . Just keep practising

      • Megan

        Thank you, I’ll try that… Yum :)

        • FSFFF

          When you get on her page, select “rice dishes”, then choose the one you want. Enjoy!

    • mesmorino

      Google and YouTube are your friends.

      • Megan

        Yes, but without already knowing the authentic recipe I might end up with something as far from the original as Jamie’s interpretation.

        • mesmorino

          That is a good point; the problem is that there are a lot of variation and there isn’t really a right or wrong way of making it. Jamie’s creation is something different, which is why people are miffed. But, for information, here’s how I make it (which is completely different to how my mum makes it):

          Dice and blend 1 bell pepper (preferably red), one onion (the larger the better), 2-3 scotch bonnets (one, if your taste buds aren’t used to spicy food), and a can of chopped tomatoes. These are minimum numbers, the more you use, the more stew you’ll have, and thus the more rice you’ll be able to make

          When blended, pour it into a pot, and add rice- You need as much rice as will just cover the stew. Too little rice and the stew will boil off, too much and the rice will burn before it’s done. So basically, pour as much stew in as the rice you’re intending to make, you can always add more later, or simply freeze the rest

          Now, add salt, your spices, herbs, and seasonings, and also about half a can of tomato puree. Also add about a tablespoonful of vegetable oil. Stir very well, then cover with foil. I don’t mean cover the pot with foil, I mean, press it down onto the rice, and then put a lid on the pot.

          I add foil because when I was learning how to make it, it always ended up soggy, so I had to cook it for longer, and typically ended up with burnt bits. I have found that the foil helps the rice absorb the stew more completely, without requiring prolonged cooking

          That’s basically it, you just keep watching it to see when it’s absorbed all the stew and if it’s not done, you add some more. If you don’t have any left, water will do- At that point, you’re trying to cook the jollof, not make it (if you see what I mean) so only add as much water as you need to stop it from burning.

          Takes about 40-45 mins from start to finish depending on pre-preparation, etc

          That’s how I do it, and I would not be surprised to find out that I’m the only one who does it that way. For one thing my mum doesn’t use foil, and she uses a lot more oil, and she dices sausages into it too. I would also not be surprised to find more efficient or more elaborate ways of making it- This is simply a method that works for me, with the minimum of fuss.

          Jamie Oliver talking about vine ripe tomatoes and chicken thighs is arrant nonsense.

          • Megan

            Tried over the weekend. Yum. Thank you for a helpful post :)

          • mesmorino

            That’s good to hear! Go on now, pictures! And how long did it take you? And what twists did you add? ;) I also forgot to mention that the type of rice you use influences the method slightly: I dislike Basmati rice and always use American Long Grain, but if you have the patience/skill for Basmati then there’s no reason you can’t use it or any other kind. With Bell peppers too, the main requirement is the colour, using green or yellow just means that your stew (and consequently your rice) will not be as red as usual

            Anyway, glad to hear it went well. Once you do it a couple more times, you’ll start to see where you can experiment or take shortcuts

  • EvilProfessorMonkeyforaHead

    Thanks Jamie. I’ve often wanted to try Jollof Rice, but most of the recipes have been nasty. This one is really nice and quick. A good taste of Africa. Well done.

    • Jellof_man

      what do you mean by Nasty? Please go ahead and try his lemon garnished tomato sauce rice.

    • FSFFF

      The other versions are not nasty, just done the proper way which takes a little more time. Jamie has made a good attempt, just a far cry from the original; like Indian Curry without Curry!

      If you “Really” want to try Jollof rice, visit a Nigerian or Ghanian restauraunt, for, between, £3-£5 you can enjoy a delicious plate.

      After you try the proper Jollof rice, you’ll think differently.

    • Buki

      You are just a silly white man calling our food nasty. Prejudicial much? I guess a burger dripping with melted cheese, ketchup and sauce isnt nasty. #statementsthatgetmemad

      • EvilProfessorMonkeyforaHead

        “Silly white man”, keep your racist comments to yourself.

      • EvilProfessorMonkeyforaHead

        “Silly white man”? Keep your racist comments firmly to yourself. Exactly how would you feel if I called you a stupid black woman. If you can’t express comments in public without insult and racism, then simply shut up.

      • EvilProfessorMonkeyforaHead

        “Silly white man”? Keep your racist comments to yourself. If you are able to do so, then simply be quiet. This is no more acceptable than me calling you a “stupid black woman”.

      • EvilProfessorMonkeyforaHead

        Why the hell has my complaint about being insulted by the racist woman been removed four times now, yet her racist comment remains!!

      • EvilProfessorMonkeyforaHead

        Kindly keep your ignorant comments to yourself.

      • EvilProfessorMonkeyforaHead

        Keep those sort of comments to yourself.

  • Callum Green

    All this ranting is pathetic. If your cultural identity is SO attached to a rice dish that a chef in a foreign country making his own version of it (yes his own version – the description clearly states that it’s just influenced by the traditional dish) then you have FAR bigger issues than this.

    • Jellof_man

      I think the title states Ghanaian Jellof rice and not Jamie Oliver’s version of Jellof rice.
      Jamie stop putting a twist to everything, this one makes it loose its essence.
      Callum in Africa we enjoy our food and make the effort in preparing it properly.
      What he has prepared is Tomato sauce rice and not Jellof rice. He is misleading people.

      • Callum Green

        And the text clearly states that it’s his twist on the recipe with European influences.

        Jamie can put a twist on whatever recipe he wants. It’s what people do in a free society.

        People enjoy their food everywhere – what they don’t do is get pathetically defensive of it and get “offended” or make up moronic stories about their ancestors dying to protect a recipe. While this kind of behaviour may be seen as normal in Africa, it’s seen as petty, childish and pathetic here. Italians don’t throw temper tantrums because we make pizza and bolognaise differently. Indians don’t throw tantrums because our curries are different. You’re acting like babies – I’m shocked you aren’t embarrassed.

        He is not misleading people as for the God knows how many-th time, it is a TWIST on the recipe. Looking up pictures of “real” Jellof rice, his version looks far more appetising and is either of them was to be described as “tomato sauce rice” it would be your version.

        • FSFFF

          Mr Callum Green,

          It appears “YOU ARE THE ONE” taking things too seriously, we know we have issues like any other country or continent for that matter so please let us be, WE ARE JUST POKING FUN AT JAMIE!!

          To those who have enjoyed the real meal (I can tell you haven’t), his version is anything but appetising.

          The beauty of Jollof rice is it’s simplicity; rice cooked in seasoned tomato sauce, so yes tomato sauce rice.

          Regards.

          ***PLEASE DO NOT REPLY***

          • Callum Green

            I’ll reply to whoever I want to thank you very much.

            I wasn’t talking about people poking fun at Jamie – there’s nothing wrong with that whatsoever. In fact, a bit of playful teasing can be very entertaining.

            I’m talking about the people who are “disgusted”, “extremely offended” and the people who going on about this being a dishonour to their dead relatives.

            And while I can see why you’d like plain tomato rice (I love plain pasta with a bit of salad cream), I would imagine the typical Englishman would find Jamie’s version more appetizing. Which is not to say it’s better, just that we don’t all have carbon copied taste buds!

          • FSFFF

            Dear Typical Englishman, Mr Callum Green,

            I hope your response made you feel better.

            To those who have enjoyed the real meal (I can tell You haven’t), his version “honestly” cannot compare & is nothing close to the original.

            The beauty of Jollof rice is it’s simplicity; rice cooked in seasoned tomato sauce. We appreciate Jamie’s attempt though.

            We are happy & Content with the current version of our Jollof Rice and don’t mind a twist or interpretation as long as it can still be RECOGNISED as Jollof rice not risotto or paella.

            Regards.

          • mesmorino

            You misunderstand. It’s not “his own version” or his own “twist”, he’s made something completely different. Like I said above, if you boil potato slices and then boil some fish, is it still “fish and chips”? Or what if you bake the fish and use crisps (which Americans call chips), is it still fish and chips?

            Given that several different countries and peoples already make the dish, there are already millions of twists on it, and they are ALL recognisably jollof rice. Even I don’t make it the same way my mum does, but it’s still jollof. How come Jamie Oliver’s twist the ONLY one that looks like something else entirely? Maybe because it is? Nobody’s saying he can’t put his own twist on a dish that already has an uncountable number of twists and variations.

            What people are taking offence to is whipping up some concoction and calling it Jollof. If I was going to make fish and chips I’d at least talk to someone British, who would rightly tell me that no, you don’t boil the fish, or stew it, or some other ridiculous “twist”, you fry it. Were any Nigerians or Ghanaians consulted? Were any Africans at all consulted? They’re the ones who eat it after all, I’m reasonably sure that they know how to make it, and everybody is agreeing that this is not it- despite, like I said, all of them having their own variation!

            As to why people are getting offended, well when your culture is constantly appropriated left and right you start being sensitive to even ordinarily trivial things like food. Right now, it basically looks like some random white man heard about jollof rice and instead of asking someone who knew how to make it to teach him, decided to whip up some crap and call it Jollof.

          • Callum Green

            I fully understand and I still think it’s utterly pathetic.

          • mesmorino

            If you still think it’s “utterly pathetic” then no, you don’t fully understand.

          • Callum Green

            Oh yes I do.

          • mesmorino

            Go on then, explain why it is utterly pathetic to be outraged at yet another instance of cultural appropriation.

            Because when you come down it, nobody is genuinely upset with Jamie Oliver. It’s food after all, and this is something that already has a thousand twists and variations. It’s mild derision to annoyance.

            Are you saying West Africans are not allowed to be defensive of something they perceive as part of their culture? If not, why not? And who gets to decide what exactly they should be defensive of? “Oh it’s just clothes, why can’t someone else wear it?” “Oh it’s just hair, why can’t they do their hair like that?

            “Oh it’s just food, why can’t Jamie Oliver put a twist on it?”

            You don’t have to agree, but when you then say it is “utterly pathetic” that just shows that no, you don’t understand what people are actually upset about.

        • Guest

          Mr Cullum Green, as a Nigerian that enjoys the Japanese Cuisine, sushi, I know not to wrap rice around “stockfish” and then call it “sushi”. The Japanese would look at me and think I am an idiot. So please, what chef Oliver cooked, was like someone else pointed out earlier is “tomato sauce rice”. I would even go as far as calling it, “tomato sauce inspired rice”. If you like you can get your knickers up in a twist, that’s your wahala.

  • Fight

    It seems when white people run out of ideas they look to Africa. When they ran out of music they stole jazz when they ran out of dance moves they took twerking, when they ran out of beauty they tried to make their skin darker and buts larger and now this.

  • XE

    While your dish looks tasty, let’s be clear – THIS IS NOT JOLLOF RICE!!!!! You can’t just substitute a whole bunch of things and still call it “Jollof” rice…. Why did you stop substituting then? Why not keep going? Why not take out the chicken and use oysters? And instead of tomatoes, soak it in cumin and pineapples? Heck, instead of rice, why not just use beans then? And still insist on calling it Jollof “rice”? …As in: “I’m pretty sure these look like beans to me; in fact, I’m 100% sure this is not rice; it tastes like beans”…. “Shut up, this is my version of Jollof Rice!!!!!”….. You get my drift? At some point, you cross the line from Jollof into Not-Jollof rice. And you done did it.

    • FSFFF

      I agree.

      We are happy & Content with the current version of our Jollof Rice and don’t mind a twist or interpretation as long as it can still be recognised as Jollof rice not risotto or paella.

  • XE

    should we find you a Nigerian wife?

  • DEBBIE SMITH

    CAN YOU ALL GET A GRIP! THIS IS AN INTERPRETATION OF JOLLOF RICE. SERIOUSLY HE’S NOT TRYING TO MOCK ANYONE, OR ROB YOU OF YOUR TRADITIONS. YOU OBVS DON’T HAVE FAITH IN YOUR DISH!
    THIS JOLLOF IS AMAZINGG, YOURS IS ALL NOTHIN COMPARED, GET BACK OR GET OUT OF THE KITCHEN!

    • FSFFF

      Ms Debbie Smith,

      It appears “YOU ARE THE ONE” taking things too seriously.

      To those who have enjoyed the real meal (I can tell You haven’t), his version “honestly” cannot compare & is nothing close to the original.

      The beauty of Jollof rice is it’s simplicity; rice cooked in seasoned tomato sauce. We appreciate Jamie’s attempt though.

      We are happy & Content with the current version of our Jollof Rice and don’t mind a twist or interpretation as long as it can still be RECOGNISED as Jollof rice not risotto or paella.

      Regards.

      ***PLEASE DO NOT REPLY***

    • XE

      huh? you must be mad

  • Beppe

    Chill out guys. Every recipe or dish on earth can be cooked in many different way to make it taste awesome. Kudos to you Jamie. People of Ghana and West Africa just relax. Jamie has made the name Jollof Rice to be GREAT. I sometime cook Jollof Rice with Cornered Beef and sometime with diced beef, with sweet corn or green beans. No harm there. Try Jamie’s recipe I am sure you will enjoy it. Relax and have fun. Again KUDOS to Jamie and other chefs around.

  • balki

    it clearly says:
    Jamie’s twist on a Jollof rice recipe

    what’s the fuss?
    but all respect to the original recipe as it cannot/shall not be westernized.
    good try Jamie …

    #weallsigneduptocomment lol

  • tom

    My wife is West African and her jollof rice is absolutely delicious. You are welcome to borrow her mother’s recipe! We appreciate your humble effort, but…..your dish looks quite greasy, Jamie. Not like my wife’s.

    • FSFFF

      I guess you’ve been enjoying proper Jollof rice.
      Easy on Jamie Guys.

  • mddolce

    You guys are pretty tough..he made it his own and I am pretty sure none of us cook it the same way. And its not about how it looks but more about how it tastes. At least he showcased some of our history and cuisine! Pls provide constructive criticisms or suggestions on ways to make the recipe better. This is how we can all grow; not by insulting or complaining but by contributing :) . Imagine an italian reacting the same way if you “attempted” to make a carbonara dish! C’mmon guys, we are better!

  • Clement Oke

    Isn’t Jollof from the Wolof people? Any Wolofs in Ghana or Nigeria? #justasking

  • Bo-Ann Nguyen

    Is this fried rice?

    • FSFFF

      Lol…

  • Leonard Sowah

    Let us calm down, at the moment I need to find out who currently hold the copyright or patent for the jollof rice recipe and let him deal with Jamie Oliver. Until then if you feel offended could you please publish your version online. There are various websites that allow users to publish their favorite recipes. Jamie gave us his version, we would love to have your version. Our elders tell us that ” it is the same child that carries the pot that ends up breaking the pot”. If Jamie took it upon himself to carry the Jollof rice pot and ended up breaking it we can only thank him for making the effort.

  • A.Papas

    Nag, nag, nag, Naggers nagging.

  • Gustav Wolof-Smiths

    this is utterly disgraceful. Shame on you!

  • Guest

    this is ridiculous – recipes are always being re-invented and having twists added or chefs making their own interpretations of them so why should this one be any different – Jamie also states that it is his recipe not the native country’s recipe! All get very much out of hand.

  • boola

    Jamies version of Jollof rice is nice. One thing we should note is that Africans do not mind spending the whole day in the kitchen to cook however, to the westerners, every thing needs to be fast and straight to thep oint. Sincerely, i would say this is a perfect definition of shortcut to preparing a yet very tasty Jollof Rice. I would agree he didnt add some Ingredients which definately can pass for some .

    However, the new ingrdients he added are not new to me. In fact, i do add coriander to any of my meals including Jollof rice stew sauce , Thanks to Dooneykitchen for that.

    I love this version of Jollof rice, cooking preferences differ. Westerners tend to cook their food in a manner that the key nutrient of each vegetable used will not be lost. That is what he has done, he didnt overboil the tomatoes which would definately have made it loose some of its benefits. etc.

    Please, dont kill this man for not COOKING FOR A VERY LONG HOURS to get the perfect Jollof rice, If every one of us is asked to write how we cook Jollof rice, then sincerely i think there will be an unending list and things like … this was how i was taught…. He has used the key and healthy ingredients … Biko……

  • TheYaziman .

    I am totally shocked when I went through Jamie’s recipe.
    Jollof rice is not just food but a symbol of west Africans this is why it is a disgrace to mess with this particular dish.
    Jollof is a part of west African’s culture messing with it means messing with soul , the root and symbol of west Africa (Ghana, Nigeria..etc)
    Some people say WTF it is only a dish! Well they are completely wrong it is them who are ignorant.
    Jamie needs to learn to respect the culture of any dish of any part of the world.
    No doubts about Jamie’s skills which I regard as one of the best chef in the world! but hurting somebody’s culture and feeling IS WRONG!!

  • mesmorino

    Jamie Oliver did so much research he forgot to go to a Nigerian restaurant to have some Jollof.

    Jamie Oliver did so much research he forgot to ask a Nigerian how to make Jollof.

    Don’t worry. Keep dulling.

    • Akpokevwe

      Jamie’s version correct bros, i beg bone da thing, besides if you have been to Jevnik restuarant in Nigeria, you go know say Jollof rice pass jollof, we sometimes not dey add these things becos money no dey period,

      • mesmorino

        my broda, no be money- What he has created is not jollof as it is understood by a lot of people. Of course jollof pass jollof, but all na jollof.

        This one though… blood of jesus no carry am

      • FSFFF

        We are happy & Content with the current version of our Jollof Rice and don’t mind a twist or interpretation as long as it can still be RECOGNISED as Jollof rice not risotto or paella….

  • FSFFF

    GOOD FOOD CHANNEL HAS A WORSE VERSION.

    Google:

    good food channel, chicken jollof rice

    (it’s the uktv one)

  • jamieoliverdotcom

    If you’ve got a great Jollof rice recipe, we want to see it! Share your Jollof recipes, pictures and ideas with us in our forums: http://goo.gl/3xgnfV

    • FSFFF

      DELETING OUR POSTS IS NOT RIGHT.

    • Akpokevwe

      Great one Jamie, lets see our my brothers and sister will present their boring Jollof rice

      • FSFFF

        We appreciate Jamie’s effort but on the 1st look, it doesn’t look like Jollof rice (till you’re told it’s Jollof rice).

        We are happy & Content with the current version of our Jollof Rice and don’t mind a twist or interpretation as long as it can still be RECOGNISED as Jollof rice not risotto or paella….

  • Akpokevwe

    I have seen all of una comment, but anyone against This Jamie’s version of Jollof is either, an a. Okpe, b. mumu, c. Traditionally inclined backwardness, d. not cook-FOOD oriented e. very nice.
    choose the category you fall under.
    1. if you read researches or even know what is happening in Nigeria, you will know that Maggi is actually bad to the body,
    2. If you understand how maggi is made, you can actually make your own maggi and use.
    3. boiling meat stock with salt then using the liquid out of it, is almost like maggi, but this time made inhouse by you
    4. Yes, big yes, you can cook without using maggi and only salt.
    5. When ever you are cooking a meal (e.g[macaroni]) that is not founded from your tradition, a piece of your tradition/culture falls into it as you compile the recipe and cook it, same goes for Jamie as he made this food
    6. The writer (Jamie), 100% knows more about Jollof rice in its totality that most of you my African brothers #Fact
    7. How many of you my African brothers have created, written or edited Wikipedia article about one food from your Culture and its history?
    8. Read again, it seems my African brothers here did not pay attention to read what the writer said about being inspired
    9. If you my African sisters/brothers are so smart to know this concept of jollof by jamie is wrong, why have you not contributed to the REAL ISSUE of EBOLA in africa,
    10. Why do you complain that the onyinbo people no gree give us black people ZMAPP or ebola trial drug, WHy we never fit come out with vaccine or drug.
    11. All of una get out dey show una busheness for here, guys the world has evolved in knowledge, get creative with your sooooooooo, boring Jollof rice, even my mum cooks jorrof rice with more swag than una self with or without maggi
    i just dey vex

    • FSFFF

      Mr Akpo (yes, I know where you’re from),

      You can dispute what others have said without being aggressive or calling names, you’re just showing you’re aggressive.

      I guess you’re educated enough to make a logical argument without calling people names or are you not?

      No. 6 leaves me speechless, Jamie knows more about Jollof rice?
      Oh! he was in a hurry and forgot to blend the tomatoes and ‘whole’ scotch bonnet pepper (hot pepper!!) because he wanted to put up the picture quickly!

      ***On ‘Real Issues’ as you put it, What have “YOU” contributed, please let us know to inspire or encourage the rest of us!!**

      We appreciate Jamie’s effort.

      We are happy & Content with the current version of our Jollof Rice and don’t mind a twist or interpretation as long as it can still be RECOGNISED as Jollof rice not risotto or paella….

      • Akpokevwe

        I gave options and i believe everyone would choose the last option which is usually the correct option of most objective test, and again, i accept his version and would happily try it out, why are you guys so protective to the recipe? ahahahahahahahah very funny, as if na gold. i can’t even remember when last i made a plain jollof except party jorrof we be like the burn pot taste, otherwise NAH nah nah

        • FSFFF

          There was NO reason whatsoever for you to give those options!!!

          From your posts, we could also easily apply the first 2 options to you (a. Okpe, b. mumu), I’m sure you wouldn’t be happy if you were called those names.

          We do not condemn Jamie but the Fact still remains the same, that does NOT LOOK like Jollof Rice!!! Google would have served as one Big resource for him.

          We appreciate Jamie’s effort. We don’t mind a twist or different interpretation as long as it can still be RECOGNISED as Jollof rice not risotto or paella….

  • Guest

    What about pilaf rice

  • Akpokevwe

    WHen it comes to Jollof rice Recipe me and my African sisters and brothers knows their right, they know their food but when it comes to Volunteering, Creativity, Helping Ebola Hit West Africa, all of una go run away. Una fit claim when person destroy una beloved Jollof recipe all of una open una big big mouth like uneducated people without sensitiveness.

    Remember EBOLA is killing people, bring our your smartness, and raise your voice, And Allow Jamie’s INSPIRED, i repeat again INSPIRED, i repeat, INSPIREd version of jollof rice, he said he was inspired, thats ENGLISH…..

    • FSFFF

      Mr Akpo (yes, I know where you’re from),

      ***As an individual WHAT have “YOU” contributed or done to help on the issue of Ebola or regarding the other issues you’ve mentioned???…..please tell us*****

      We appreciate Jamie’s effort. We are happy & Content with the current version of our Jollof Rice and don’t mind a twist or interpretation as long as it can still be RECOGNISED as Jollof rice not risotto or paella….

      • Akpokevwe

        I’ve not contributed any thing oh my brother, but at least i no follow una dey argue about a chef’s inspired version of a west african cuisine. and making the man feel he has racially crossed boundries, if the whites do this to us we will feel bad too, why una no fit moodly critised and acknowledge. remember again he said inspired

        • FSFFF

          Mr Akpo,

          If you cannot contribute positively to the argument being made then please save your time and go watch a movie or take a nap.

          We do not condemn Jamie but the Fact still remains the same, that does NOT LOOK like Jollof Rice!!! Google would have served as one Big resource for him.

          We appreciate Jamie’s effort. We don’t mind a twist or different interpretation as long as it can still be RECOGNISED as Jollof rice not risotto or paella….

  • Akpokevwe

    Just Assume the British people or Americans make a farce about how we turn Good English to Pidgin, no they didn’t they accepted, guys move on, and all of una we no know say you can cook without MAGGI, i wonder if you know how to cook at all, cos to prove you really know how to cook you must know how to create your spice from the scratch

    • FSFFF

      Mr Akpo (yes, I know where you’re from),

      One consequence of colonisation ‘Around the World’ is different variations of English in those countries where colonisation occurred because the slave masters had to find a way to communicate with the slaves in countries or communities who already had their own indigenous language, the result; pidgin or creole!!

      Jamie has NOT CREATED any spice from scratch (hopefully you don’t argue he created a herb too)

      I perceive you do not even know your way around the kitchen but you’re just mashing up different articles (or WORSE, the words of other people) on this comments section so you come across as smart to everyone.

      We appreciate Jamie’s effort. We are happy & Content with the current version of our Jollof Rice and don’t mind a twist or interpretation as long as it can still be RECOGNISED as Jollof rice not risotto or paella….

  • Akpokevwe

    CHeck all the MAster checf competition non have featured a West-African inspired cuisine, but they feature, Moroccan dish, Asian, Thai, even South African, but they know West Africa is a no go area, becos we like stupid fight.then allow our government dey pocket big big money every day

    • FSFFF

      Mr Akpo (yes, I know where you’re from),

      Please do NOT use this comments section to Express your locked up BITTERNESS towards African leaders!! Keep it simple, we’re talking about food.

      ****WHAT HAVE “YOU” DONE TO HELP YOUR COUNTRY??****

      Cooking a West-African dish requires a considerable amount of time and skill (not to mention pre-preparation time). You just don’t read the recipe then proceed to cook it or create your version, It Is Not Done—This is probably why they are not currently featured on Master Chef, maybe in the future!!

      We appreciate Jamie’s effort. We are happy & Content with the current version of our Jollof Rice and don’t mind a twist or interpretation as long as it can still be RECOGNISED as Jollof rice not risotto or paella….

  • Scotty

    “When your jollof got ebola but you hungry as hell”

  • https://soundcloud.com/soup_herman soup, herman?

    People! People! Clearly the only way to resolve this is with a nationwide Jollof Cook-Off (abbr. Joll-off). Come armed with your mum’s best recipe and a six pack of Supermalt!

  • Bittaye

    This is not Jollof rice At all. Call it your ”Jamie-lof rice” but please not jollof rice.

    Little history of this dish:

    Named after a region in Senegambia called jollof, is a traditional dish of the wollof tribe in gambia and senegal, hence the name jollof rice. The dish is common in almost all the west african countries. Its is called Benachin in wollof which means one-pot. and it is not cooked in an oven and definitely not a 15mins recipe. And Maggi is an essential ingredient.

  • Gold

    White people steal everything, water is wet

  • Gold

    This actually looks really good but it’s not Jollof or even similar to the Ghanaian recipe so not sure how it’s ‘inspired’ by Ghana. No you don’t get to put your name on a culture’s dish and completely fuck it up. I get that this is a variation but he’s a world renowned millionaire chef. Try harder. Gordon Ramsay traveled to India before even trying to attempt their dishes. Anyway bout to put beef and bread together and call it a Mexican burrito.

  • Gold

    Some of you Uncle Toms need to stop acting like you aren’t looked at funny when you consider yourself British or when you try to speak a European language. They don’t care about you, you are just another ‘negro’ to them until it’s time to take snippets of your culture. Stop defending stupidity.

  • Omo Saskatchewan

    why not give it another name??? Saying it is Jamie’s twist of Jollof rice does not make it better! My grandma will roll in her grave (God rest her soul. Please this is nothing like what we have at our owambe parties… the word JOLLOF is not to e tampered with

  • Anna Gueye

    Hello I am of Senegalese origin. Joloff rice in not West African but Senegalese. It is our national dish. The version that is done in other African countries has nothing to do with our original Thieboudiene (when done with fish) or Thiebouyapp (when done with meat) so as far as I am concerned your version is not the worse that I have seen.

  • guest

    Pple should stop behaving like they don’t understand words. He simply said his “twist of jelof rice.” Food is great and anyone can add whatever they want on a recipe and play with recipes. I do that all the time at home, mixing up recipes and i bet most pple do too, but the fact that your not putting it up on the internet no one complains . I think pple should reason a little bit more before using their key boards.

  • Gold

    if an African chef recreated roast, you’d get tons of angry White people claiming how their tradition has been ruined and how the immigrants are taking over.

    Ain’t nobody whinging about how he ‘evolved’ cultures. But White people have magic hands. They have the power to turn everything once considered backward into ‘cool’ and ‘innovative’.

  • Biod

    This shit make me puke…..I was seriously throwing up my guts looking at this crap. Let’s see how your BRITS will embrace your different version of FISH and CHIPS or PIE and MASH!!

  • mercyd

    jamie, jamie, jamie,…. come on my son… how can you deem to call squished up vine tomatoes into chicken stock infused soggy rice “jollof”. you would have been better calling it “goneoff” rice…please remember that this recipe has been perfected and handed down to generations after generations on the basis that no outsiders know the “family” recipe. …why would you even attempt it without consulting with a true african…. even if it you claim it was only inspired by it. I am a thorough bred ghanaian through and through. we may not have much as africans – at the moment – but what we do have are traditions, pride and love of our culture…. please respect it and though you are a great chef…promise to NEVER, NEVER again attempt this… did you not learn from Tesco’s attempt last year which was quickly discontinued??? stick to what you are good at and what you know and we will continue with what we know.

    xx

  • Salone babe

    Nah wah o! A beg, this is not Jollof rice nah coriander rice.

  • Nobu

    I’m Japanese and have seen so many weird versions of bastardized sushi everywhere in North America and Europe, so I understand how you feel, West Africans, but you know what, it’s just food, and people who find out about your food and like it will try to spread it to their friends and family, and in doing so, your food will be adapted and changed. Try to be generous, hang on to something else for your cultural identity, because you are more than just a recipe.

  • Rich

    I made this yesterday and it was fantastic…………. Much better than the original recipe.

  • http://www.paintermain.wordpress.com Felix Kweku Aryeetey

    I think it should be called something else preferably “Shitlof”, not the jollof i have been eating since i dropped outta the “vagina” of ma mum.

    HAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!

  • thisistrix

    Kwasia. So we de do jollof? Aboa. Translate this too: Wo maame tw3.

  • Toti

    Well done Jamie! Looks absolutely yummy. Creativity is what makes cooking interesting, and that’s what you’ve done. Now, to my fellow West Africans (I’m Nigerian)-TAKE A CHILL PILL PUHHLEAAAASE! I would commend Jamie for megally publicizing our delicious jollof rice. We all complain about how West African dishes are not popular globally (like Curry is associated to India). Someone gives jollof rice the much needed/deserved publicity, and we’re over-criticizing him. SMH. Once again, well done Jamie!

  • iamnotakata

    Trash…you people always want to take something that doesn’t belong to yo and then essentially ruin it and its origins i.e. America, braids now Jollof rice…It’s almost a curse word for you to present that mess as “Jollof rice” girl no… Lemon? Parsley? That is real caucasian of you…if you want to honor the culture and pay homage to West African cuisines don’t butcher and bland it out with you traditional white ways and actually create the recipe the way it was intended otherwise remove the word Jollof from in front of it and call it spring rice because I assure you what you are presenting is no such thing.. This recipe is despicable.

    • EvilProfessorMonkeyforaHead

      “You people”, “traditional white ways”. Do you want to back away from the racism!

      • iamnotakata

        Girl shutup.

        • EvilProfessorMonkeyforaHead

          If you can’t open your mouth without ejecting low-brow racist crap, followed by idiot snap-backs, then just keep your mouth shut and do everyone a favour with your silence. Further spouting is just compounding your clear ignorance.

          • iamnotakata

            Ma’am who hurt you? Your opinion is of no value girl.

  • Kirkcudbright

    I don’t get why anyone’s upset. I have been cooking ‘jollof’ rice for ages, and often stir through chopped green herbs, spring onions, hardboiled eggs, chicken livers- whatever’s hanging around the kitchen. I don’t think that’s insulting anyone and no-one, west african or otherwise, has ever refused to eat it on the grounds that I have ‘appropriated their culture’. What about those outrageous people who add mushrooms to spaghetti bolognese, which i hate. So I don’t add mushrooms to mine. But I don’t insist that no-one else does. Who cares if the guy likes his rice with herbs? It’s his life. No-one is making you eat it.

  • Kirkcudbright

    In fact, not to upset anyone, but you know how i’m cooking it tonight? With little meatballs made of some really nice salty herby leftover pork sausage from the fridge, fried then all stired through. I love it like that. I hope I don’t get death threats now.

  • Win

    Jollof rice is more of a concept than a recipe? More of a Concept? CONCEPT? You say CONCEPT???????? Oga, couldn’t you find a better word than CONCEPT????? Trust me, you really don’t want to be saying things like this……. Hahahahahahahahahhaahahaha……..

  • Eddy

    Guyyy, are you feeding dogs…what the hell is this. Learn to cook please.