My favourite hot & sour rhubarb & crispy pork with noodles

hot and sour rhubarb and crispy pork with noodles

Serves 6

  • 1 kg higher-welfare pork belly, boned, rind removed, cut into 3-4cm cubes

  • sea salt

  • freshly ground black pepper

  • groundnut or vegetable oil

  • 375 g medium egg noodles

  • 4 spring onions, trimmed and finely sliced

  • 1 fresh red chilli, deseeded and finely sliced

  • 2 punnets cresses (such as coriander, shiso or basil cresses)

  • 1 bunch fresh coriander

  • 3 limes

  • For the marinade

  • 400 g rhubarb

  • 4 tablespoons runny honey

  • 4 tablespoons soy sauce

  • 4 cloves garlic, peeled

  • 2 fresh red chillies, halved and deseeded

  • 1 heaped teaspoon five-spice

  • 1 thumb-sized piece fresh ginger, peeled and chopped

Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/gas 4. Place the pork pieces in a roasting tray and put to one side. Chuck all the marinade ingredients in a food processor and pulse until you have a smooth paste, then pour all this over the pork, adding a large wineglass of water. Mix it all up, then tightly cover the tray with tinfoil and place in the preheated oven for about an hour and 30 minutes, or until the meat is tender, but not coloured.



Pick the pieces of sauce out of the pan and put to one side. The sauce left in the pan will be deliciously tasty and pretty much perfect. However, if you feel it needs to be thickened slightly, simmer on a gentle heat for a bit until reduced to the consistency of ketchup. Season nicely to taste, add a little extra soy sauce if need be, then remove from the heat and put to one side.



Put a pan of salted water on to boil. Get yourself a large pan or wok on the heat and pour in a good drizzle of groundnut or vegetable oil. Add your pieces of pork to the wok and fry for a few minutes until crisp and golden. (You might need to do this in two batches.) At the same time, drop your noodles into the boiling water and cook for a few minutes, then drain most of the water away. Divide the noodles into four warmed bowls immediately, while they're still moist.



What I love most about this dish is the contrast between the flavours going on in it: from the simple, plain noodles to the zinginess of the spicy rhubarb sauce and the beautifully crispy, yet melt-in-your-mouth pork. To finish, spoon over a good amount of rhubarb sauce. Divide your crispy pork on top, and add a good sprinkling of spring onions, chilli, cresses and coriander. Serve with half a lime each – perfect.

Nutritional Information

My favourite hot & sour rhubarb & crispy pork with noodles

Fresh and lively for summer

0 foodies cooked this
Don't ask me why, but this pork with rhubarb recipe just works! The crispy pork's immense
Serves 6
1h 50m
Super easy
Method

This recipe was a total experiment, and I was so pleased that it worked! I wanted to use the acidity and flavour of the rhubarb to produce an incredible sauce in which to stew that tough old bit of pork, the belly, until deliciously tender. The pieces of pork were then wok-fried until crisp and served with the rhubarb sauce and some simply cooked noodles – bloody hell, what a dish! It's a winner. PS You should be able to get hold of interesting cresses at any good supermarket.

Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/gas 4. Place the pork pieces in a roasting tray and put to one side. Chuck all the marinade ingredients in a food processor and pulse until you have a smooth paste, then pour all this over the pork, adding a large wineglass of water. Mix it all up, then tightly cover the tray with tinfoil and place in the preheated oven for about an hour and 30 minutes, or until the meat is tender, but not coloured.

Pick the pieces of sauce out of the pan and put to one side. The sauce left in the pan will be deliciously tasty and pretty much perfect. However, if you feel it needs to be thickened slightly, simmer on a gentle heat for a bit until reduced to the consistency of ketchup. Season nicely to taste, add a little extra soy sauce if need be, then remove from the heat and put to one side.

Put a pan of salted water on to boil. Get yourself a large pan or wok on the heat and pour in a good drizzle of groundnut or vegetable oil. Add your pieces of pork to the wok and fry for a few minutes until crisp and golden. (You might need to do this in two batches.) At the same time, drop your noodles into the boiling water and cook for a few minutes, then drain most of the water away. Divide the noodles into four warmed bowls immediately, while they're still moist.

What I love most about this dish is the contrast between the flavours going on in it: from the simple, plain noodles to the zinginess of the spicy rhubarb sauce and the beautifully crispy, yet melt-in-your-mouth pork. To finish, spoon over a good amount of rhubarb sauce. Divide your crispy pork on top, and add a good sprinkling of spring onions, chilli, cresses and coriander. Serve with half a lime each – perfect.

Whether it's delicious vegetarian or vegan recipes you're after, or ideas for gluten or dairy-free dishes, you'll find plenty here to inspire you. For more info on how we classify our lifestyle recipes please read our special diets fact sheet, or or for more information on how to plan your meals please see our special diets guidance.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 948 47%
  • Carbs 19.9g 9%
  • Sugar 19.2g 21%
  • Fat 88.6g 126%
  • Saturates 32.3g 161%
  • Protein 16.9g 38%
Of an adult's reference intake

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BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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