Steak & kidney pudding

Serves 6

  • For the filling:

  • 2 rashers of quality smoked streaky bacon, roughly chopped

  • olive oil

  • ½ a whole nutmeg, for grating

  • 1 heaped teaspoon ground allspice

  • 4 fresh bay leaves

  • 4 sprigs of fresh rosemary

  • 2 onions, peeled and roughly chopped

  • 1 tablespoon marmalade

  • 2 tablespoons plain flour

  • 4 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

  • 750 ml organic beef stock

  • 2 tablespoons tomato purée

  • 500 g chuck steak, cut into 2.5cm dice

  • a little butter, for greasing

  • 250 g kidneys, pork or lamb, halved, trimmed and cut into 1cm dice

  • 2 carrots

  • 6 button mushrooms, wiped clean and quartered

  • sea salt

  • freshly ground pepper

  • 50 g Cheddar or Stilton cheese

  • For the pastry:

  • 350 g self-raising flour

  • 75 g unsalted butter

  • 100 g Atora shredded suet

  • sea salt

A steamed meat pudding is so traditional, so comforting and so completely British I just love everything about it. I'm revisiting the classic savoury combo of steak and kidney for this one.



Put a large casserole-type pan on a high heat and add the bacon and a lug of olive oil. When lightly golden, add the nutmeg, allspice, bay, rosemary sprigs and chopped onions, turn the heat to medium and cook for 10 minutes, stirring often. As the onions soften, add the marmalade, plain flour and Worcestershire sauce. Fry and stir until it is quite dark, then add your stock, tomato purée and diced steak. Simmer for 1 hour with the lid on.



Put the self-raising flour, butter, suet and a couple of pinches of salt into a bowl and use your fingers to rub the fat into the flour. Once the mixture resembles breadcrumbs, add roughly 100ml of cold water to bring it together until you have a soft dough. Cover with clingfilm and place in the fridge. When the stew has had an hour, pour it into a large colander over another large pan, so the gravy drips into the pan below. Discard the herb sprigs. Tear off a large sheet of greaseproof paper and rub both sides with butter, then push and flatten it inside a 1.5 litre pudding bowl.



Dust a clean surface with flour and roll out 80% of your dough so it's about 0.5cm thick. Loosely drape it over the rolling pin, then unroll it over the pudding basin. Push and pat it in, letting a couple of centimetres hang over the edge. Gently mix the diced kidneys, carrots and mushrooms into the stew that's in the colander, season with salt and pepper, crumble in the cheese, then pour that dense stew into your pudding basin – don't worry if it doesn't quite fill it. Put the pan of gravy aside. Roll out the last bit of dough, put it on top of the filling, fold over the overhanging pastry to seal and pack it down, then put a sheet of buttered greaseproof face down on top, followed by a piece of tin foil. Get 2 metres of string, wrap it round the rim of the bowl twice, tie it in a double knot twice, then attach the other end to the opposite side with a double knot to make a handle – this will make pulling the bowl out at the end much easier. Go to www.jamieoliver.com/how-to for a quick tutorial on this if you like. Put the pudding into a large pan that the pudding basin will fit inside with the lid on, then half fill it with water. Put the lid on, boil, then simmer with the lid on for 3 hours. Set a timer, and top up with water every now and then.



When ready, carefully pull out the basin, cut away and discard the string, greaseproof paper and foil, and place a nice serving platter on top. Carefully and confidently turn over and leave upturned while you warm up the reserved gravy and get any veggies ready. When you're ready to serve, carefully ease the basin off, peel away the paper and pour over a little of the hot gravy. Take to the table with your seasonal veg.

Nutritional Information

Steak & kidney pudding

A traditional steamed meat pudding

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0 foodies cooked this
This classic steak and kidney pud is so comforting and so completely British I just love everything about it.
Serves 6
3h
Not too tricky
Print this recipe
Method

A steamed meat pudding is so traditional, so comforting and so completely British I just love everything about it. I'm revisiting the classic savoury combo of steak and kidney for this one.

Put a large casserole-type pan on a high heat and add the bacon and a lug of olive oil. When lightly golden, add the nutmeg, allspice, bay, rosemary sprigs and chopped onions, turn the heat to medium and cook for 10 minutes, stirring often. As the onions soften, add the marmalade, plain flour and Worcestershire sauce. Fry and stir until it is quite dark, then add your stock, tomato purée and diced steak. Simmer for 1 hour with the lid on.

Put the self-raising flour, butter, suet and a couple of pinches of salt into a bowl and use your fingers to rub the fat into the flour. Once the mixture resembles breadcrumbs, add roughly 100ml of cold water to bring it together until you have a soft dough. Cover with clingfilm and place in the fridge. When the stew has had an hour, pour it into a large colander over another large pan, so the gravy drips into the pan below. Discard the herb sprigs. Tear off a large sheet of greaseproof paper and rub both sides with butter, then push and flatten it inside a 1.5 litre pudding bowl.

Dust a clean surface with flour and roll out 80% of your dough so it's about 0.5cm thick. Loosely drape it over the rolling pin, then unroll it over the pudding basin. Push and pat it in, letting a couple of centimetres hang over the edge. Gently mix the diced kidneys, carrots and mushrooms into the stew that's in the colander, season with salt and pepper, crumble in the cheese, then pour that dense stew into your pudding basin – don't worry if it doesn't quite fill it. Put the pan of gravy aside. Roll out the last bit of dough, put it on top of the filling, fold over the overhanging pastry to seal and pack it down, then put a sheet of buttered greaseproof face down on top, followed by a piece of tin foil. Get 2 metres of string, wrap it round the rim of the bowl twice, tie it in a double knot twice, then attach the other end to the opposite side with a double knot to make a handle – this will make pulling the bowl out at the end much easier. Go to www.jamieoliver.com/how-to for a quick tutorial on this if you like. Put the pudding into a large pan that the pudding basin will fit inside with the lid on, then half fill it with water. Put the lid on, boil, then simmer with the lid on for 3 hours. Set a timer, and top up with water every now and then.

When ready, carefully pull out the basin, cut away and discard the string, greaseproof paper and foil, and place a nice serving platter on top. Carefully and confidently turn over and leave upturned while you warm up the reserved gravy and get any veggies ready. When you're ready to serve, carefully ease the basin off, peel away the paper and pour over a little of the hot gravy. Take to the table with your seasonal veg.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:

Calories

Calories are just a unit of energy. If you eat more than you use you can gain weight, or lose it if you don't eat enough. How much you need depends on your weight, gender and how active you are, but it's around 2,000 a day.

Carbs

Carbs are a great source of energy and, excluding foods such as potatoes, are made from grains - like bread, pasta and cereal. We all need carbs, but try to make them all wholegrain by sticking to brown bread, rice and pasta - they are much more nutritious.

Sugar

We all deserve a treat sometimes, but try to limit your sugar intake. Most of your sugar should come from raw fruit and milk, because they give us lots of nutrients too. Always check food labels so you know how much sugar you're eating.

Fat

We all need to eat a small amount of fat because it protects our organs and helps us grow. But we need to be careful about how much fat we eat and what kinds of fat, because in higher levels it's associated with weight gain, diabetes, cancer and heart disease.

Saturates

Saturated or "bad fats" are in beef, pork, chicken skin, butter, cream and cheese. Too much can be bad for our heart and cholesterol levels, but unsaturated or "good fats" in fish, nuts, avocados and some oils can help keep our hearts healthy if eaten in moderation.

Protein

Protein helps our muscles to grow and repair, as well as providing you with essential amino acids. When it comes to protein, try to eat leaner sources such as chicken and fish or non-meat sources such as eggs, dairy, beans, nuts, seeds, tofu and pulses.
  • Calories 806
    40%
  • Carbs 56.9g
    22%
  • Sugar 11g 12%
  • Fat 44g 63%
  • Saturates 20.6g 103%
  • Protein 44g 98%
Of an adult's reference intake

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BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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  • For the filling:

  • 2 rashers of quality smoked streaky bacon, roughly chopped

  • olive oil

  • ½ a whole nutmeg, for grating

  • 1 heaped teaspoon ground allspice

  • 4 fresh bay leaves

  • 4 sprigs of fresh rosemary

  • 2 onions, peeled and roughly chopped

  • 1 tablespoon marmalade

  • 2 tablespoons plain flour

  • 4 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

  • 750 ml organic beef stock

  • 2 tablespoons tomato purée

  • 500 g chuck steak, cut into 2.5cm dice

  • a little butter, for greasing

  • 250 g kidneys, pork or lamb, halved, trimmed and cut into 1cm dice

  • 2 carrots

  • 6 button mushrooms, wiped clean and quartered

  • sea salt

  • freshly ground pepper

  • 50 g Cheddar or Stilton cheese

  • For the pastry:

  • 350 g self-raising flour

  • 75 g unsalted butter

  • 100 g Atora shredded suet

  • sea salt